Pediatric Annals

NEWBORN INTENSIVE CARE

Leonard Glass, MD

Abstract

Toshiko Hirata and June P. Brady NEWBORN INTENSIVE CARE Springfield, Ill.: Charles C Thomas, Publisher, 1977, 179 pp.. $16.75.

In this succinct, lucid, and readable monograph, Drs. Hirata and Brady focus their attention, in 10 short chapters, on some of the most critical areas of neonatal intensive care. Four chapters are devoted to fluid and electrolyte metabolism, two to cardiopulmonary adaptation, and one each to the fetus and placenta, thermoregulation, perinatal pharmacology, and the use of breast milk in the neonatal intensive-care unit. Other important areas of neonatal intensive care - such as infection, bilirubin metabolism, endocrinology, parenteral alimentation, and disorders of carbohydrate metabolism - are not covered in the book.

The material is as up-todate as is possible in a textbook (the latest references are from 1975), and just about all pertinent points are covered, with excellent correlation of basic concepts and clinical considerations. However, because of the brevity of the book, a good deal of detail is omitted. The illustrations and tables are commendable and add to the value of the book.

There is one statement with which I would like to take issue. The authors state that hyaline membrane disease does not occur in infants exposed to heroin in utero. While its incidence is markedly decreased following maternal use of heroin, it is nonetheless occasionally observed before 32 weeks' gestation in these infants.

The book will probably be of greatest benefit to house officers at the first- and second-year level and to nurses assigned to the neonatal intensive-care unit.…

Toshiko Hirata and June P. Brady NEWBORN INTENSIVE CARE Springfield, Ill.: Charles C Thomas, Publisher, 1977, 179 pp.. $16.75.

In this succinct, lucid, and readable monograph, Drs. Hirata and Brady focus their attention, in 10 short chapters, on some of the most critical areas of neonatal intensive care. Four chapters are devoted to fluid and electrolyte metabolism, two to cardiopulmonary adaptation, and one each to the fetus and placenta, thermoregulation, perinatal pharmacology, and the use of breast milk in the neonatal intensive-care unit. Other important areas of neonatal intensive care - such as infection, bilirubin metabolism, endocrinology, parenteral alimentation, and disorders of carbohydrate metabolism - are not covered in the book.

The material is as up-todate as is possible in a textbook (the latest references are from 1975), and just about all pertinent points are covered, with excellent correlation of basic concepts and clinical considerations. However, because of the brevity of the book, a good deal of detail is omitted. The illustrations and tables are commendable and add to the value of the book.

There is one statement with which I would like to take issue. The authors state that hyaline membrane disease does not occur in infants exposed to heroin in utero. While its incidence is markedly decreased following maternal use of heroin, it is nonetheless occasionally observed before 32 weeks' gestation in these infants.

The book will probably be of greatest benefit to house officers at the first- and second-year level and to nurses assigned to the neonatal intensive-care unit.

10.3928/0090-4481-19771001-17

Sign up to receive

Journal E-contents