Pediatric Annals

Questions for the Family Counselor

David Belais Friedman, MD; Hershel K Swinger

Abstract

In using the strategy discussed by Dr. Foster in the preceding article, the pediatrician or family counselor may find it helpful tó ask parents the following four questions:

1. Does what you are doing now work? Does it produce the desired behavior?

2. Is the "desired behavior" age appropriate and a realistic expectation?

3. What are the effects on the child and on the family of what you are doing now?

4. Have you tried alternative methods of changing behavior or coping with the situation?

The counselor may also find it helpful to ask himself a number of questions:

1. What is the family interacting or coping style, and is it constructive or destructive - helpful or part of the problem?

2. Can the parents see their role in the problem, or is it all "the child's fault"?

3. Are the family members willing to reach out for and accept help? Are they open to change?

4. How do family members kel about themselves?

5. What help would be most appropriate for this family at this time?

In the following article, Dr. Williams discusses these and other issues as he approaches the problem of adolescence.…

In using the strategy discussed by Dr. Foster in the preceding article, the pediatrician or family counselor may find it helpful tó ask parents the following four questions:

1. Does what you are doing now work? Does it produce the desired behavior?

2. Is the "desired behavior" age appropriate and a realistic expectation?

3. What are the effects on the child and on the family of what you are doing now?

4. Have you tried alternative methods of changing behavior or coping with the situation?

The counselor may also find it helpful to ask himself a number of questions:

1. What is the family interacting or coping style, and is it constructive or destructive - helpful or part of the problem?

2. Can the parents see their role in the problem, or is it all "the child's fault"?

3. Are the family members willing to reach out for and accept help? Are they open to change?

4. How do family members kel about themselves?

5. What help would be most appropriate for this family at this time?

In the following article, Dr. Williams discusses these and other issues as he approaches the problem of adolescence.

10.3928/0090-4481-19771001-07

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