Pediatric Annals

Book Reviews 

PEDIATRIC SURGICAL PATHOLOGY

S Frank Redo, MD

Abstract

Debner, Louis P., M.D. PEDIATRIC SURGICAL PATHOLOGY St. Louis: C. V. Mosby, 1975, 582 pp., $62.50.

"One of the major purposes of this volume," the author states in the preface, "is an attempt to bridge the interface between the problems of general pediatric pathology and surgical pathology." General pathology deals with the essenHal changes caused by disease, while surgical pathology is concerned with the study of the diseases that are accessible to operative intervention. Since it is the first such book devoted entirely to the surgical pathology of infancy and childhood, it not only serves as a hallmark but also will undoubtedly become the model for similar efforts in the future.

The subject matter covered is extensive and includes problems of skin and supporting adnexae; breast; head and neck; eye and adnexae; mediastinum, lungs, and cardiovascular system; gastrointestinal tract; liver, gallbladder, and extrahepatic biliary tract; endocrine system; kidney; lower genitourinary system; male and female reproductive systems; lymphatic and hematopoietic systems; soft tissue, peritoneum, and retroperitoneurn; bone and joint; and central nervous and neuromuscular systems. In each of these categories, the diseases encountered that lend themselves to surgical intervention - and, thus, to a specimen available for the surgical pathologist's examination - are discussed. These range from the congenital problems encountered in the newborn to such conditions as appendicitis, cholelithiasis, and neoplasms of many of the organ systems.

The text is clear and concise, with short sentences and a minimum of redundancy and repetition. Up-to-date papers are cited as references, and the bibliography for each of the chapters is extensive and pertinent. The book is profusely illustrated with high-quality reproductions of excellent examples of the gross, microscopic, and ultramicroscopic appearance of many of the problems discussed.

However, in this reviewer's opinion, a deficiency exists in that, in many instances, pertinent enologie or prognostic features of a lesion or pathologic process are not discussed in depth but, rather, are indicated as a reference to an original article. There is no doubt that the book would be more meaningful if the author had discussed such material after analysis and evaluation instead of merely indicating the source.

Nonetheless, this is a major comprehensive work and should be valuable not only to pathologists but also to surgeons and pediatricians at all levels of training and experience. In my opinion, the rough spots will be polished and the deficiencies in presentation corrected in future editions, and this book will become a classic in its field.…

Debner, Louis P., M.D. PEDIATRIC SURGICAL PATHOLOGY St. Louis: C. V. Mosby, 1975, 582 pp., $62.50.

"One of the major purposes of this volume," the author states in the preface, "is an attempt to bridge the interface between the problems of general pediatric pathology and surgical pathology." General pathology deals with the essenHal changes caused by disease, while surgical pathology is concerned with the study of the diseases that are accessible to operative intervention. Since it is the first such book devoted entirely to the surgical pathology of infancy and childhood, it not only serves as a hallmark but also will undoubtedly become the model for similar efforts in the future.

The subject matter covered is extensive and includes problems of skin and supporting adnexae; breast; head and neck; eye and adnexae; mediastinum, lungs, and cardiovascular system; gastrointestinal tract; liver, gallbladder, and extrahepatic biliary tract; endocrine system; kidney; lower genitourinary system; male and female reproductive systems; lymphatic and hematopoietic systems; soft tissue, peritoneum, and retroperitoneurn; bone and joint; and central nervous and neuromuscular systems. In each of these categories, the diseases encountered that lend themselves to surgical intervention - and, thus, to a specimen available for the surgical pathologist's examination - are discussed. These range from the congenital problems encountered in the newborn to such conditions as appendicitis, cholelithiasis, and neoplasms of many of the organ systems.

The text is clear and concise, with short sentences and a minimum of redundancy and repetition. Up-to-date papers are cited as references, and the bibliography for each of the chapters is extensive and pertinent. The book is profusely illustrated with high-quality reproductions of excellent examples of the gross, microscopic, and ultramicroscopic appearance of many of the problems discussed.

However, in this reviewer's opinion, a deficiency exists in that, in many instances, pertinent enologie or prognostic features of a lesion or pathologic process are not discussed in depth but, rather, are indicated as a reference to an original article. There is no doubt that the book would be more meaningful if the author had discussed such material after analysis and evaluation instead of merely indicating the source.

Nonetheless, this is a major comprehensive work and should be valuable not only to pathologists but also to surgeons and pediatricians at all levels of training and experience. In my opinion, the rough spots will be polished and the deficiencies in presentation corrected in future editions, and this book will become a classic in its field.

10.3928/0090-4481-19761001-12

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