Pediatric Annals

NEUROLOGY OF INFANCY AND CHILDHOOD

Ann Maravilla, MD

Abstract

Carter, S., and Gold, A., eds. NEUROLOGY OF INFANCY AND CHILDHOOD New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1974. 216 pp., $26.

This monograph has been taken verbatim from the recent edition of Barnett's Pediatrics and published separately in order to make the material more widely available. I suspect that it will be used in the future as the basis for an expanded text.

Twenty-one noted contributors have written this authoritative volume. Although most topics are briefly covered, they contain a significant amount of information in a readily accessible form. Good editing is evident in every section, and each topic is followed by a list of pertinent current references, greatly expanding its usefulness. Also of special note are the excellent photographic reproductions, high-quality schematic drawings, and useful charts and graphs.

Chapters are devoted to basic diagnostic principles, developmental defects, static encephalopathies, degenerative and demyelinating diseases, tumors, pseudotumor cerebri, cardiovascular diseases, trauma, paroxysmal disorders, peripheral neuropathies, infections, and diseases of muscle; there is also a chapter on three neurologic conditions seen only in children.

There are a few topics that have been glossed over, and other texts will need to be consulted. There is a section devoted to the neurologic examination of the child, but it is very limited and primarily points out the special features of examination of the newborn. Under diagnostic procedures the EMI is not mentioned, although it is not yet widely available. The pathophysiologic basis of clinical signs and symptoms is mentioned in many of the sections, but a chapter devoted to this would have been valuable and helpful.

Overall the book is to be recommended for the nonneurologist as a valuable text and reference book on pediatric neurology. The book's format makes it useful whether it is read cover to cover or consulted on specific topics.…

Carter, S., and Gold, A., eds. NEUROLOGY OF INFANCY AND CHILDHOOD New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1974. 216 pp., $26.

This monograph has been taken verbatim from the recent edition of Barnett's Pediatrics and published separately in order to make the material more widely available. I suspect that it will be used in the future as the basis for an expanded text.

Twenty-one noted contributors have written this authoritative volume. Although most topics are briefly covered, they contain a significant amount of information in a readily accessible form. Good editing is evident in every section, and each topic is followed by a list of pertinent current references, greatly expanding its usefulness. Also of special note are the excellent photographic reproductions, high-quality schematic drawings, and useful charts and graphs.

Chapters are devoted to basic diagnostic principles, developmental defects, static encephalopathies, degenerative and demyelinating diseases, tumors, pseudotumor cerebri, cardiovascular diseases, trauma, paroxysmal disorders, peripheral neuropathies, infections, and diseases of muscle; there is also a chapter on three neurologic conditions seen only in children.

There are a few topics that have been glossed over, and other texts will need to be consulted. There is a section devoted to the neurologic examination of the child, but it is very limited and primarily points out the special features of examination of the newborn. Under diagnostic procedures the EMI is not mentioned, although it is not yet widely available. The pathophysiologic basis of clinical signs and symptoms is mentioned in many of the sections, but a chapter devoted to this would have been valuable and helpful.

Overall the book is to be recommended for the nonneurologist as a valuable text and reference book on pediatric neurology. The book's format makes it useful whether it is read cover to cover or consulted on specific topics.

10.3928/0090-4481-19751101-10

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