Pediatric Annals

Guest Editor's Foreword

Maria I New, MD

Abstract

In this issue and in the August issue of Pediatric Annals, devoted to endocrinology in infancy and childhood, I have brought together the work of American and European colleagues who have made great strides in hormonal diseases of childhood.

Dr. Zvi Laron's article on the treatment of diabetes in Israel is of interest to pediatricians in the United States because the management of diabetes presented in it differs from that used here. Dr. La ron, who was chairman of the Second International Beilinson Symposium on the Various Faces of Diabetes in Juveniles held in Israel in October 1972, practices in the highly controlled and closed community of Tel Aviv. This kind of community makes the type of management he describes possible. Clearly, the author knows his families well and has a large team of people to deal with them.

It is doubtful whether such a system of treatment of diabetes would work in urban and suburban centers of this country. Indeed, it may be dangerous to allow children to be out of the hospital with uncontrolled diabetes if follow-up is not assured. Nevertheless, this experiment is working in Israel, and we as pediatricians should know about it.

I would like to dedicate these two issues of Pediatric Annais to Dr. Ralph E. Peterson and Dr. Norman Kretchmer, who have been my teachers and whose leadership, patience, and dedication led me into the field of pediatric endocrinology.

I hope these issues give an overview of the frontiers of pediatric endocrinology today.…

In this issue and in the August issue of Pediatric Annals, devoted to endocrinology in infancy and childhood, I have brought together the work of American and European colleagues who have made great strides in hormonal diseases of childhood.

Dr. Zvi Laron's article on the treatment of diabetes in Israel is of interest to pediatricians in the United States because the management of diabetes presented in it differs from that used here. Dr. La ron, who was chairman of the Second International Beilinson Symposium on the Various Faces of Diabetes in Juveniles held in Israel in October 1972, practices in the highly controlled and closed community of Tel Aviv. This kind of community makes the type of management he describes possible. Clearly, the author knows his families well and has a large team of people to deal with them.

It is doubtful whether such a system of treatment of diabetes would work in urban and suburban centers of this country. Indeed, it may be dangerous to allow children to be out of the hospital with uncontrolled diabetes if follow-up is not assured. Nevertheless, this experiment is working in Israel, and we as pediatricians should know about it.

I would like to dedicate these two issues of Pediatric Annais to Dr. Ralph E. Peterson and Dr. Norman Kretchmer, who have been my teachers and whose leadership, patience, and dedication led me into the field of pediatric endocrinology.

I hope these issues give an overview of the frontiers of pediatric endocrinology today.

10.3928/0090-4481-19740701-01

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