Pediatric Annals

CME Article 

Navigating Recurrent Abdominal Pain Through Clinical Clues, Red Flags, and Initial Testing

B U.K. Li, MD; Joshua D. Noe, MD

Abstract

Johnny, a 10-year-old boy, presents to your office with a month-long history of chronic, daily periumbilical pain, which has kept him from attending school. This is an all-too common scenario: 13% to 17% of all adolescents have had chronic abdominal pain, and 2% to 4% of your office visits are for this problem. With all of the possibilities of functional disorders, along with organic disorders affecting visceral organs and musculoskeletal systems, where do you begin the evaluation?

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Joshua D. Noe, MD, is Assistant Professor, Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition, Medical College of Wisconsin. B U.K. Li, MD, is Professor, Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition, Medical College of Wisconsin.

Address correspondence to: 8701 Watertown Plank Rd., Milwaukee, WI 53226.

Dr. Li and Dr. Noe have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Abstract

Johnny, a 10-year-old boy, presents to your office with a month-long history of chronic, daily periumbilical pain, which has kept him from attending school. This is an all-too common scenario: 13% to 17% of all adolescents have had chronic abdominal pain, and 2% to 4% of your office visits are for this problem. With all of the possibilities of functional disorders, along with organic disorders affecting visceral organs and musculoskeletal systems, where do you begin the evaluation?

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Joshua D. Noe, MD, is Assistant Professor, Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition, Medical College of Wisconsin. B U.K. Li, MD, is Professor, Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition, Medical College of Wisconsin.

Address correspondence to: 8701 Watertown Plank Rd., Milwaukee, WI 53226.

Dr. Li and Dr. Noe have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Johnny, a 10-year-old boy, presents to your office with a month-long history of chronic, daily periumbilical pain, which has kept him from attending school. This is an all-too common scenario: 13% to 17% of all adolescents have had chronic abdominal pain, and 2% to 4% of your office visits are for this problem. With all of the possibilities of functional disorders, along with organic disorders affecting visceral organs and musculoskeletal systems, where do you begin the evaluation?

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Joshua D. Noe, MD, is Assistant Professor, Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition, Medical College of Wisconsin. B U.K. Li, MD, is Professor, Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition, Medical College of Wisconsin.

Address correspondence to: 8701 Watertown Plank Rd., Milwaukee, WI 53226.

Dr. Li and Dr. Noe have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

10.3928/00904481-20090501-06

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