Meeting News Coverage

New drug showed promising results against neonatal enteroviral sepsis

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — The investigational antiviral drug pocapavir had promising effects on an infant with enterovirus infection, according to data presented here at the St. Jude/PIDS Pediatric Infectious Diseases Research Conference.

Sanet Torres-Torres, MD, of the department of infectious diseases at Children’s Mercy Hospital, and colleagues evaluated a female neonate who presented with coagulopathy that required respiratory support. The patient tested positive for enterovirus and had severe enteroviral sepsis. Torres-Torres and colleagues initiated treatment with the investigational drug candidate pocapavir (V-073, ViroDefense, Inc.), which is being developed for poliovirus but has also shown activity against non-polio enteroviruses.

Sanet Torres-Torres

The enterovirus was identified by the CDC as Coxsackievirus B3 and parental consent was obtained to use pocapavir, 20 mg/kg/day for treatment.

Ten days of therapy were completed and viral cultures were negative. However, serum PCR remained positive. Coagulopathy resolved when the patient was aged 29 days and she was subsequently discharged at aged 56 days.

“We think this is a potential candidate in terms of treatment for this enteroviral infection,” Torres-Torres told Infectious Diseases in Children. “However, more studies are needed because this is the first time it was used for this, but I think it’s a good start.” — by Amber Cox

For more information:

Torres-Torres S. Abstract 201413. Presented at: St. Jude/PIDS Pediatric Infectious Diseases Research Conference 2014; Feb. 21-22, 2014; Memphis, Tenn.

Disclosure: Torres-Torres reports no relevant financial disclosures.

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — The investigational antiviral drug pocapavir had promising effects on an infant with enterovirus infection, according to data presented here at the St. Jude/PIDS Pediatric Infectious Diseases Research Conference.

Sanet Torres-Torres, MD, of the department of infectious diseases at Children’s Mercy Hospital, and colleagues evaluated a female neonate who presented with coagulopathy that required respiratory support. The patient tested positive for enterovirus and had severe enteroviral sepsis. Torres-Torres and colleagues initiated treatment with the investigational drug candidate pocapavir (V-073, ViroDefense, Inc.), which is being developed for poliovirus but has also shown activity against non-polio enteroviruses.

Sanet Torres-Torres

The enterovirus was identified by the CDC as Coxsackievirus B3 and parental consent was obtained to use pocapavir, 20 mg/kg/day for treatment.

Ten days of therapy were completed and viral cultures were negative. However, serum PCR remained positive. Coagulopathy resolved when the patient was aged 29 days and she was subsequently discharged at aged 56 days.

“We think this is a potential candidate in terms of treatment for this enteroviral infection,” Torres-Torres told Infectious Diseases in Children. “However, more studies are needed because this is the first time it was used for this, but I think it’s a good start.” — by Amber Cox

For more information:

Torres-Torres S. Abstract 201413. Presented at: St. Jude/PIDS Pediatric Infectious Diseases Research Conference 2014; Feb. 21-22, 2014; Memphis, Tenn.

Disclosure: Torres-Torres reports no relevant financial disclosures.