Pediatric Annals

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CME Article 

Tick-borne Diseases

Jean Y. Rim, MD; Stephen Eppes, MD

  • Pediatric Annals. 2007;36(7)
  • Posted July 1, 2007

Abstract

Ticks are blood-sucking arthropods which can act as vectors for numerous infections. The most common tick-borne diseases in the United States are Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME), and human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA), all caused by rickettsia; Lyme disease, caused by a spirochete; tularemia, caused by a gramnegative bacillus; and babesiosis, caused by an intra-erythrocytic protozoan.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Jean Y. Rim, MD, is an Infectious Disease Fellow, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL. Stephen Eppes, MD, is with the Department of Pediatrics, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, and the Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE.

Address correspondence to: Jean Y. Rim, MD, Rush University Medical Center, Section of Infectious Disease, 600 S. Paulina, Suite 143, Academic Facility, Chicago, IL 60612; fax 312-942-2184; or e-mail Jean_Rim@rush.edu.

Dr. Rim and Dr. Eppes have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Recognize the epidemiology of common tick-borne diseases in the United States.
  2. Develop an approach to diagnosis and management of various tickborne infections.
  3. Identify practical measures to prevent these diseases.

Abstract

Ticks are blood-sucking arthropods which can act as vectors for numerous infections. The most common tick-borne diseases in the United States are Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME), and human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA), all caused by rickettsia; Lyme disease, caused by a spirochete; tularemia, caused by a gramnegative bacillus; and babesiosis, caused by an intra-erythrocytic protozoan.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Jean Y. Rim, MD, is an Infectious Disease Fellow, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL. Stephen Eppes, MD, is with the Department of Pediatrics, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, and the Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE.

Address correspondence to: Jean Y. Rim, MD, Rush University Medical Center, Section of Infectious Disease, 600 S. Paulina, Suite 143, Academic Facility, Chicago, IL 60612; fax 312-942-2184; or e-mail Jean_Rim@rush.edu.

Dr. Rim and Dr. Eppes have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Recognize the epidemiology of common tick-borne diseases in the United States.
  2. Develop an approach to diagnosis and management of various tickborne infections.
  3. Identify practical measures to prevent these diseases.

Ticks are blood-sucking arthropods which can act as vectors for numerous infections. The most common tick-borne diseases in the United States are Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME), and human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA), all caused by rickettsia; Lyme disease, caused by a spirochete; tularemia, caused by a gramnegative bacillus; and babesiosis, caused by an intra-erythrocytic protozoan.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Jean Y. Rim, MD, is an Infectious Disease Fellow, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL. Stephen Eppes, MD, is with the Department of Pediatrics, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, and the Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE.

Address correspondence to: Jean Y. Rim, MD, Rush University Medical Center, Section of Infectious Disease, 600 S. Paulina, Suite 143, Academic Facility, Chicago, IL 60612; fax 312-942-2184; or e-mail Jean_Rim@rush.edu.

Dr. Rim and Dr. Eppes have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Recognize the epidemiology of common tick-borne diseases in the United States.
  2. Develop an approach to diagnosis and management of various tickborne infections.
  3. Identify practical measures to prevent these diseases.

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