Pediatric Annals

Feature Article 

Alternatives for Fragrance-allergic Children

Sharon E. Jacob, MD; Mari Paz Castanedo-Tardan, MD

Abstract

Allergy to fragrances in children has become a more widely recognized entity over the past decade.1-5 This is not surprising given the high number of children’s products containing fragrances, from detergents to diapers to moisturizers to scented toys. Unfortunately, for some children, even very small amounts of fragrances can trigger and maintain an eczematoid-type dermatitis.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Sharon E. Jacob, MD, is Assistant Clinical Professor Medicine and Pediatrics (Dermatology), University of California, San Diego, and Volunteer Clinical Associate Professor in Dermatology, University of Miami, Miami, Florida. Mari Paz Castanedo-Tardan, MD, is with Universidad Anahuac School of Medicine, Mexico City, Mexico.

Address correspondence to Sharon E. Jacob, MD: sjacob@contactderm.net.

Dr. Jacob and Dr. Castanedo-Tardan have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

The authors thank Jordana Herschthal for the assistance with product research and the construct of the table.

Abstract

Allergy to fragrances in children has become a more widely recognized entity over the past decade.1-5 This is not surprising given the high number of children’s products containing fragrances, from detergents to diapers to moisturizers to scented toys. Unfortunately, for some children, even very small amounts of fragrances can trigger and maintain an eczematoid-type dermatitis.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Sharon E. Jacob, MD, is Assistant Clinical Professor Medicine and Pediatrics (Dermatology), University of California, San Diego, and Volunteer Clinical Associate Professor in Dermatology, University of Miami, Miami, Florida. Mari Paz Castanedo-Tardan, MD, is with Universidad Anahuac School of Medicine, Mexico City, Mexico.

Address correspondence to Sharon E. Jacob, MD: sjacob@contactderm.net.

Dr. Jacob and Dr. Castanedo-Tardan have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

The authors thank Jordana Herschthal for the assistance with product research and the construct of the table.

Allergy to fragrances in children has become a more widely recognized entity over the past decade.1-5 This is not surprising given the high number of children’s products containing fragrances, from detergents to diapers to moisturizers to scented toys. Unfortunately, for some children, even very small amounts of fragrances can trigger and maintain an eczematoid-type dermatitis.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Sharon E. Jacob, MD, is Assistant Clinical Professor Medicine and Pediatrics (Dermatology), University of California, San Diego, and Volunteer Clinical Associate Professor in Dermatology, University of Miami, Miami, Florida. Mari Paz Castanedo-Tardan, MD, is with Universidad Anahuac School of Medicine, Mexico City, Mexico.

Address correspondence to Sharon E. Jacob, MD: sjacob@contactderm.net.

Dr. Jacob and Dr. Castanedo-Tardan have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

The authors thank Jordana Herschthal for the assistance with product research and the construct of the table.

10.3928/00904481-20080201-04

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