Pediatric Annals

Case Challenges 

A 6-month-old Boy with White Oral Lesions

Abstract

Editor’s note: Each month, this department features a discussion of an unusual diagnosis in genetics, radiology, or dermatology. A description and images are presented, with the diagnosis and an explanation of how the diagnosis was determined following. As always, your comments are welcome. Please e-mail marcher@slackinc.com.

A 6-month-old boy was referred to the dermatology clinic for evaluation of white plaques in his mouth. The lesions had been present at birth, and he was previously treated with oral anti-candidal solution. By history the plaques seem to be getting slightly larger. They were not causing any difficulty with his feeding or pain. He was a full-term baby without any complications during pregnancy or delivery. He is otherwise thriving, with no chronic medical conditions. The social history and review of systems are noncontributory. The parent reports that the family history is notable for a 7-year-old cousin with similar lesions, but nobody else in the family has such findings. He has no known drug allergies and is not taking any medication.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Ingrid Polcari, MD; and Sarah L. Chamlin, MD, are from the Division of Pediatric Dermatology, Children’s Memorial Medical Center, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL.

Abstract

Editor’s note: Each month, this department features a discussion of an unusual diagnosis in genetics, radiology, or dermatology. A description and images are presented, with the diagnosis and an explanation of how the diagnosis was determined following. As always, your comments are welcome. Please e-mail marcher@slackinc.com.

A 6-month-old boy was referred to the dermatology clinic for evaluation of white plaques in his mouth. The lesions had been present at birth, and he was previously treated with oral anti-candidal solution. By history the plaques seem to be getting slightly larger. They were not causing any difficulty with his feeding or pain. He was a full-term baby without any complications during pregnancy or delivery. He is otherwise thriving, with no chronic medical conditions. The social history and review of systems are noncontributory. The parent reports that the family history is notable for a 7-year-old cousin with similar lesions, but nobody else in the family has such findings. He has no known drug allergies and is not taking any medication.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Ingrid Polcari, MD; and Sarah L. Chamlin, MD, are from the Division of Pediatric Dermatology, Children’s Memorial Medical Center, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL.

10.3928/0090-4481-20061201-09

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