Meeting News

Patients prefer epinephrine nasal spray over auto-injector

Photo of Stephen Beckman
Stephen Beckman

NEW ORLEANS — Results of surveys collected from patients with severe allergies suggested they significantly preferred an epinephrine nasal spray over an epinephrine auto-injector, according to findings presented at the AAP National Conference & Exhibition.

Stephen Beckman, chief commercial officer at Bryn Pharma, noted that nasal epinephrine is currently not available in the United States.

“There is a real desire to have alternative delivery options to auto-injectors to treat anaphylaxis,” he told Infectious Diseases in Children.

Researchers assessed participants’ preference between nasal epinephrine and an epinephrine auto-injector using an eight-question survey. Twenty-seven children and 29 adults in six states who had severe allergies and were prescribed epinephrine autoinjectors were included in the study.

The researchers assisted in the simulated use of both the nasal epinephrine and epinephrine auto-injectors.

Patients reported a significant preference for nasal epinephrine (P < .05). Specifically, they preferred the nasal spray’s portability, ease of learning and use, as well as the safety, size and comfort. Patients were also more likely to recommend this product to others.

Beckman said that the nasal epinephrine device is still in development and that no application has been filed yet with the FDA. In February, the FDA fast-tracked intranasal epinephrine spray — ARS-1 (ARS Pharmaceuticals) — for the treatment of anaphylaxis.

“Upon drug approval, our goal is to distribute the product nationally and expand the availability and choice of epinephrine options for the treatment of anaphylaxis,” Beckman said. “A core objective of the organization is to supply and dispense our product through both traditional retail and more positively disruptive patient-direct platforms to improve overall patient access.” – by Katherine Bortz

Reference:

Soosaar J, et al. Multicenter, randomized crossover preference study of Bidose epinephrine nasal spray vs. EpiPen®. Presented at: AAP National Conference & Exhibition; Oct. 25-29, 2019; New Orleans.

Disclosure: Beckman is an employee of Bryn Pharma.

Photo of Stephen Beckman
Stephen Beckman

NEW ORLEANS — Results of surveys collected from patients with severe allergies suggested they significantly preferred an epinephrine nasal spray over an epinephrine auto-injector, according to findings presented at the AAP National Conference & Exhibition.

Stephen Beckman, chief commercial officer at Bryn Pharma, noted that nasal epinephrine is currently not available in the United States.

“There is a real desire to have alternative delivery options to auto-injectors to treat anaphylaxis,” he told Infectious Diseases in Children.

Researchers assessed participants’ preference between nasal epinephrine and an epinephrine auto-injector using an eight-question survey. Twenty-seven children and 29 adults in six states who had severe allergies and were prescribed epinephrine autoinjectors were included in the study.

The researchers assisted in the simulated use of both the nasal epinephrine and epinephrine auto-injectors.

Patients reported a significant preference for nasal epinephrine (P < .05). Specifically, they preferred the nasal spray’s portability, ease of learning and use, as well as the safety, size and comfort. Patients were also more likely to recommend this product to others.

Beckman said that the nasal epinephrine device is still in development and that no application has been filed yet with the FDA. In February, the FDA fast-tracked intranasal epinephrine spray — ARS-1 (ARS Pharmaceuticals) — for the treatment of anaphylaxis.

“Upon drug approval, our goal is to distribute the product nationally and expand the availability and choice of epinephrine options for the treatment of anaphylaxis,” Beckman said. “A core objective of the organization is to supply and dispense our product through both traditional retail and more positively disruptive patient-direct platforms to improve overall patient access.” – by Katherine Bortz

Reference:

Soosaar J, et al. Multicenter, randomized crossover preference study of Bidose epinephrine nasal spray vs. EpiPen®. Presented at: AAP National Conference & Exhibition; Oct. 25-29, 2019; New Orleans.

Disclosure: Beckman is an employee of Bryn Pharma.

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