Meeting News Coverage

STI project boosts screening rates among adolescents

The implementation of the Bronx Ongoing Pediatric Screening project, which targets sexually transmitted infections, improved screening rates among adolescents, according to data presented at the 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine Annual Meeting.

M. Diane McKee, MD, of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and colleagues launched the Bronx Ongoing Pediatric Screening project (BOPS) in March 2011. The project aimed to improve screening rates across newborn genetics, metabolic and infectious diseases, developmental and social/emotional disorders among children, school age and adolescent mental health, and STIs in a large Bronx primary care network. The researchers assessed rates of sexual activity and screenings for gonorrhea, chlamydia and HIV among adolescents aged 13 to 19 years before and after the launch of the program.

Between March 2011 and May 2013, screening rates for gonorrhea and chlamydia increased from 67% to 86% at BOPS sites and from 38% to 78% at non-BOPS sites among sexually active participants. HIV screening increased from 54% to 74% at BOPS sites and from 33% to 70% at non-BOPS sites. Of those who visited a BOPS site, the annual rate of gonorrhea and chlamydia tests per individual increased from 15.4% at baseline to 34.7% in 2012. The rate of gonorrhea and chlamydia tests per individual at non-BOPS sites increased from 12.1% at baseline to 23.8% in 2012.

“Our findings demonstrate that focused quality improvement efforts involving learning collaboratives, improvement coaching, electronic medical record-generated data feedback and multi-disciplinary teams improve documentation of sexual activity and increase rates of STI screening for both male and female adolescents. BOPS activities appear to promote additional improvement, especially for screening of adolescent males,” the researchers concluded.

For more information:

McKee MD. Abstract 121. Presented at: SAHM 2014; March 23-26, 2014; Austin, Texas.

The implementation of the Bronx Ongoing Pediatric Screening project, which targets sexually transmitted infections, improved screening rates among adolescents, according to data presented at the 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine Annual Meeting.

M. Diane McKee, MD, of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and colleagues launched the Bronx Ongoing Pediatric Screening project (BOPS) in March 2011. The project aimed to improve screening rates across newborn genetics, metabolic and infectious diseases, developmental and social/emotional disorders among children, school age and adolescent mental health, and STIs in a large Bronx primary care network. The researchers assessed rates of sexual activity and screenings for gonorrhea, chlamydia and HIV among adolescents aged 13 to 19 years before and after the launch of the program.

Between March 2011 and May 2013, screening rates for gonorrhea and chlamydia increased from 67% to 86% at BOPS sites and from 38% to 78% at non-BOPS sites among sexually active participants. HIV screening increased from 54% to 74% at BOPS sites and from 33% to 70% at non-BOPS sites. Of those who visited a BOPS site, the annual rate of gonorrhea and chlamydia tests per individual increased from 15.4% at baseline to 34.7% in 2012. The rate of gonorrhea and chlamydia tests per individual at non-BOPS sites increased from 12.1% at baseline to 23.8% in 2012.

“Our findings demonstrate that focused quality improvement efforts involving learning collaboratives, improvement coaching, electronic medical record-generated data feedback and multi-disciplinary teams improve documentation of sexual activity and increase rates of STI screening for both male and female adolescents. BOPS activities appear to promote additional improvement, especially for screening of adolescent males,” the researchers concluded.

For more information:

McKee MD. Abstract 121. Presented at: SAHM 2014; March 23-26, 2014; Austin, Texas.

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