In the Journals

Massage therapy may reduce pain, anxiety after surgery for tibial shaft fracture

Results showed reduction in pain and anxiety among patients who underwent massage therapy after surgery for a tibial shaft fracture.

Researchers randomly assigned 66 patients who underwent surgery for a tibial shaft fracture to receive either a 10-minute foot massage on the second day after surgery or routine care. Before and after intervention, researchers collected pain intensity and anxiety using the pain numeric rating scale and Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory.

Prior to intervention, results showed no statistically significant differences in pain intensity and anxiety between the intervention and control groups. However, 2 hours after intervention, researchers noted a statistically significant difference in the mean score for pain intensity, with a score of approximately 4.72 in the intervention group and of approximately 5.72 in the control group. The two groups also showed significant differences in terms of anxiety, according to results.

“Massage therapy as a feasible and acceptable intervention after surgery reduced pain and anxiety in patients who underwent a tibial shaft fracture surgery; therefore, using this intervention is suggested in clinical practice, especially in an orthopedic setting,” the authors wrote. – by Casey Tingle

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

Results showed reduction in pain and anxiety among patients who underwent massage therapy after surgery for a tibial shaft fracture.

Researchers randomly assigned 66 patients who underwent surgery for a tibial shaft fracture to receive either a 10-minute foot massage on the second day after surgery or routine care. Before and after intervention, researchers collected pain intensity and anxiety using the pain numeric rating scale and Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory.

Prior to intervention, results showed no statistically significant differences in pain intensity and anxiety between the intervention and control groups. However, 2 hours after intervention, researchers noted a statistically significant difference in the mean score for pain intensity, with a score of approximately 4.72 in the intervention group and of approximately 5.72 in the control group. The two groups also showed significant differences in terms of anxiety, according to results.

“Massage therapy as a feasible and acceptable intervention after surgery reduced pain and anxiety in patients who underwent a tibial shaft fracture surgery; therefore, using this intervention is suggested in clinical practice, especially in an orthopedic setting,” the authors wrote. – by Casey Tingle

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.