In the Journals

Intraoperative imaging, screw navigation may reduce articular surface in acetabular fractures

Published results showed increased accuracy in articular surface reduction and decreased radiation exposure when intraoperative imaging and screw navigation was used in the treatment of displaced acetabular fractures.

Researchers matched 35 patients with acute acetabular fractures treated using an intraoperative O-arm imaging system (Medtronic, Sofamor) and screw navigation (Stealthstation Treon system, Medtronic Sofamor Danek) with 35 cases in a database. Articular reduction was considered the primary outcome measure, and secondary outcomes included radiation dosage, operative variables and postoperative variables.

Results showed 87.1% of patients in the O-arm group achieved reduction postoperatively vs. 64.7% of patients in the control group. Researchers found a mean gap of articular fragments of 3.6 mm and 5.6 mm in the O-arm group and control group, respectively. Patients in the O-arm group had a decrease in intraoperative blood loss and transfusions, as well as an increase in surgical time, according to results, but no other differences were identified between the two groups. When compared with a routine postoperative CT scan, researchers noted a decrease in the total radiation dose with the use of the intraoperative O-arm. – by Casey Tingle

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

Published results showed increased accuracy in articular surface reduction and decreased radiation exposure when intraoperative imaging and screw navigation was used in the treatment of displaced acetabular fractures.

Researchers matched 35 patients with acute acetabular fractures treated using an intraoperative O-arm imaging system (Medtronic, Sofamor) and screw navigation (Stealthstation Treon system, Medtronic Sofamor Danek) with 35 cases in a database. Articular reduction was considered the primary outcome measure, and secondary outcomes included radiation dosage, operative variables and postoperative variables.

Results showed 87.1% of patients in the O-arm group achieved reduction postoperatively vs. 64.7% of patients in the control group. Researchers found a mean gap of articular fragments of 3.6 mm and 5.6 mm in the O-arm group and control group, respectively. Patients in the O-arm group had a decrease in intraoperative blood loss and transfusions, as well as an increase in surgical time, according to results, but no other differences were identified between the two groups. When compared with a routine postoperative CT scan, researchers noted a decrease in the total radiation dose with the use of the intraoperative O-arm. – by Casey Tingle

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

    See more from Emerging Data