New topics to be featured during annual Joint Replacement Awareness Day

Short, round table discussions with visual aids will be used instead.

On May 9, 2020, BoneSmart will host its annual Joint Replacement Awareness Day, a free online educational web event geared toward patients with joint pain who are considering, planning or have had joint replacement surgery.

Orthopedics Today is the official media partner of Joint Replacment Awareness Day.

“This is our third year. In the first, we were general and tried to cover a lot of topics,” Raj K. Sinha, MD, PhD, moderator of Joint Replacement Awareness Day and president of STAR Orthopedics, told Orthopedics Today. “The second year, we focused a bit more on what some of the attendees and the website visitors wanted to see more of and this year, we are going to drill it down more.”

Changes to the meeting

According to Sinha, topics of this year’s meeting will include unexpected pain and swelling after surgery, as well as the pros and cons of different surgical approaches and team management strategies.

Michael D. Ries

Michael D. Ries, MD, faculty member of Joint Replacement Awareness Day and fellowship co-director of Reno Orthopedic Clinic, said they are planning to include a discussion of platelet-rich plasma and stem cells and new technology in orthopedic surgery.

“If the technology improves outcomes in any way and does not have much risk, then it is good; but a lot of times, it takes a while for new technology to be proven and to establish a role and newer is not always better,” Ries said. “We do include sections on new technology, which I think are of interest more to orthopedic surgeons than patients, and keeps us as updated as we can about having an accurate assessment of the relative value of that technology.”

Raj K. Sinha

Sinha said the format of the meeting has also shifted away from lecture-based presentations to “more round table discussions with appropriate visual aids.”

“Patients were saying that they wanted to hear multiple opinions about the same topic, but not necessarily in as much depth as we were going into in the lectures,” Sinha said.

They also plan to keep the presentations shorter and parcel them out in a way that allows patients to tune in to topics of interest instead of having “to spend 5 to 6 hours watching an online presentation to catch 20 to 30 minutes of what is important” to them, he said.

Resource for patients, surgeons

According to Sinha, Joint Replacement Awareness Day is not just for patients who had joint replacement surgery, but also for patients considering joint replacement surgery and for surgeons to use as a resource for their own office education programs.

“We do not necessarily want to be a resource only for patients who had surgery. We want to be a resource for people who are thinking about surgery, maybe even have not made the decision about surgery, so that they understand better what to expect going in,” Sinha said. “This year, I think we are going to focus a bit more on scientific data as opposed to opinion, particularly when it comes to certain treatments and certain surgical approaches.” – by Casey Tingle

Disclosures: Sinha reports he is a board member for BoneSmart. Ries reports no relevant financial disclosures.

 

 

On May 9, 2020, BoneSmart will host its annual Joint Replacement Awareness Day, a free online educational web event geared toward patients with joint pain who are considering, planning or have had joint replacement surgery.

Orthopedics Today is the official media partner of Joint Replacment Awareness Day.

“This is our third year. In the first, we were general and tried to cover a lot of topics,” Raj K. Sinha, MD, PhD, moderator of Joint Replacement Awareness Day and president of STAR Orthopedics, told Orthopedics Today. “The second year, we focused a bit more on what some of the attendees and the website visitors wanted to see more of and this year, we are going to drill it down more.”

Changes to the meeting

According to Sinha, topics of this year’s meeting will include unexpected pain and swelling after surgery, as well as the pros and cons of different surgical approaches and team management strategies.

Michael D. Ries

Michael D. Ries, MD, faculty member of Joint Replacement Awareness Day and fellowship co-director of Reno Orthopedic Clinic, said they are planning to include a discussion of platelet-rich plasma and stem cells and new technology in orthopedic surgery.

“If the technology improves outcomes in any way and does not have much risk, then it is good; but a lot of times, it takes a while for new technology to be proven and to establish a role and newer is not always better,” Ries said. “We do include sections on new technology, which I think are of interest more to orthopedic surgeons than patients, and keeps us as updated as we can about having an accurate assessment of the relative value of that technology.”

Raj K. Sinha

Sinha said the format of the meeting has also shifted away from lecture-based presentations to “more round table discussions with appropriate visual aids.”

“Patients were saying that they wanted to hear multiple opinions about the same topic, but not necessarily in as much depth as we were going into in the lectures,” Sinha said.

They also plan to keep the presentations shorter and parcel them out in a way that allows patients to tune in to topics of interest instead of having “to spend 5 to 6 hours watching an online presentation to catch 20 to 30 minutes of what is important” to them, he said.

Resource for patients, surgeons

According to Sinha, Joint Replacement Awareness Day is not just for patients who had joint replacement surgery, but also for patients considering joint replacement surgery and for surgeons to use as a resource for their own office education programs.

“We do not necessarily want to be a resource only for patients who had surgery. We want to be a resource for people who are thinking about surgery, maybe even have not made the decision about surgery, so that they understand better what to expect going in,” Sinha said. “This year, I think we are going to focus a bit more on scientific data as opposed to opinion, particularly when it comes to certain treatments and certain surgical approaches.” – by Casey Tingle

Disclosures: Sinha reports he is a board member for BoneSmart. Ries reports no relevant financial disclosures.