From OT Europe

NJR announces significant increase in joint replacement procedures performed

The orthopedic joint replacement register for England, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Isle of Man published a report that demonstrated a significant increase in joint replacement procedures.

Martyn L. Porter

According to a press release from the National Joint Registry (NJR), there were approximately 243,000 joint replacement cases submitted to the NJR. The figure represented an increase of more than 20,000 procedures recorded in the registry for the previous period.

The latest annual report by the NJR highlights outcomes for hip, knee, shoulder, elbow and ankle replacements. There are 2.35 million records in the registry.

According to the report, the risk of having a first-time implant replaced within 13 years was low. The average patient is female; however, most patients who undergo ankle replacement are male.

“These are impressive results and we should not lose sight of the fact that joint replacement gets patients back to their chosen lifestyle sooner, free from pain and with improved mobility,” Martyn L. Porter, FRCS, the medical director and vice chairman of the NJR, said in the release.

The data showed a trend of increased likelihood for younger patients to have revision across all joint replacement procedures.

“This trend is particularly relevant given the increase in total number of patients undergoing joint replacement. If younger patients are most likely to need at least one revision surgery in their lifetime, then we must use the maturing dataset of the NJR to get the first-time surgery as right for the patient as possible,” Porter said in the release.

 

Reference:

www.njrcentre.org.uk

 

The orthopedic joint replacement register for England, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Isle of Man published a report that demonstrated a significant increase in joint replacement procedures.

Martyn L. Porter

According to a press release from the National Joint Registry (NJR), there were approximately 243,000 joint replacement cases submitted to the NJR. The figure represented an increase of more than 20,000 procedures recorded in the registry for the previous period.

The latest annual report by the NJR highlights outcomes for hip, knee, shoulder, elbow and ankle replacements. There are 2.35 million records in the registry.

According to the report, the risk of having a first-time implant replaced within 13 years was low. The average patient is female; however, most patients who undergo ankle replacement are male.

“These are impressive results and we should not lose sight of the fact that joint replacement gets patients back to their chosen lifestyle sooner, free from pain and with improved mobility,” Martyn L. Porter, FRCS, the medical director and vice chairman of the NJR, said in the release.

The data showed a trend of increased likelihood for younger patients to have revision across all joint replacement procedures.

“This trend is particularly relevant given the increase in total number of patients undergoing joint replacement. If younger patients are most likely to need at least one revision surgery in their lifetime, then we must use the maturing dataset of the NJR to get the first-time surgery as right for the patient as possible,” Porter said in the release.

 

Reference:

www.njrcentre.org.uk