From OT Europe

Focus on registries, impact on practice during EFORT Congress in Lisbon

EFORT

Since the 2015 congress, each year EFORT has featured a specific theme that is reflected in the scientific program of the congress and included as the overarching topic for core discussions in all the planned sessions. The selected theme always seeks to be aligned with the EFORT mission of improving patient care.

For our upcoming EFORT Congress in Lisbon, the topic “Registries & Impact On Practice” will be the driving principle that will emphasize key topics in joint arthroplasty and focus on medical device surveillance. The major aim of arthroplasty procedures is to find not only the best solution for the patient, but also the best use of the implants and bearings that will help the “new joint” work perfectly.

Lisbon Banner

Science, research and especially long-term national registry investigations have all provided good guidance on when the risk of joint arthroplasty failure is higher compared to other implants and/or situations. Using registry data from research for education purposes is a key way to provide experiences and practices in medical device surveillance.

For the last 4 years, EFORT, together with its standing committee NORE - Network of Orthopaedic Registries of Europe, has been working to provide advice and awareness on medical device surveillance and its outcomes at an international level. This ranges from data capture (eg, nomenclature on implant attributes) through data analysis and reporting techniques, to new methodology for evaluating performance of common medical devices. The ultimate purpose of this exchange between practitioners, patients, government bodies and related industry partners is to present “best practices” from established registries to create a blueprint for emerging registries.

Congress highlights, which link important components within the scientific program, will include patient selection, implant selection and survival, prediction of outcome, value-based health care, revision rate, patient safety, quality improvement, patient-reported outcomes and patient involvement. Several of the scheduled sessions put forward many crucial topics linked with our 2019 main theme to enhance the current knowledge in this specific area. Among these is the Michael Freeman Honorary Lecture entitled, “Lessons learned from the Australian Registries” presented by Dr. Richard De Steiger, as well as the Invited Nation Symposium that highlight the metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty outcomes and the remaining problems. These sessions highlight the involvement of a delegation from the Australian Orthopaedic Association (AOA) that will be able to enhance the scientific content of the meeting with its outstanding orthopaedic and trauma research and in-depth work in registries.

Moreover, the 2019 scientific program will promote broad exchanges around important questions like, “Do surgeons trust registry data?” and “How and when do registries make a difference?” But, it will also feature a symposium on non-arthroplasty registries to be organized and conducted by the active members of NORE.

EFORT is convinced that “Registries & Impact on Practice” can bridge important components that affect members of the orthopaedic and trauma community, leading to long-term delivery of better health care and improvement in patients’ quality of life. Finally, and importantly, this key main theme will give to our attendees the chance to see the latest products related to joint arthroplasty from our industry partners in the exhibition area.

EFORT

Since the 2015 congress, each year EFORT has featured a specific theme that is reflected in the scientific program of the congress and included as the overarching topic for core discussions in all the planned sessions. The selected theme always seeks to be aligned with the EFORT mission of improving patient care.

For our upcoming EFORT Congress in Lisbon, the topic “Registries & Impact On Practice” will be the driving principle that will emphasize key topics in joint arthroplasty and focus on medical device surveillance. The major aim of arthroplasty procedures is to find not only the best solution for the patient, but also the best use of the implants and bearings that will help the “new joint” work perfectly.

Lisbon Banner

Science, research and especially long-term national registry investigations have all provided good guidance on when the risk of joint arthroplasty failure is higher compared to other implants and/or situations. Using registry data from research for education purposes is a key way to provide experiences and practices in medical device surveillance.

For the last 4 years, EFORT, together with its standing committee NORE - Network of Orthopaedic Registries of Europe, has been working to provide advice and awareness on medical device surveillance and its outcomes at an international level. This ranges from data capture (eg, nomenclature on implant attributes) through data analysis and reporting techniques, to new methodology for evaluating performance of common medical devices. The ultimate purpose of this exchange between practitioners, patients, government bodies and related industry partners is to present “best practices” from established registries to create a blueprint for emerging registries.

Congress highlights, which link important components within the scientific program, will include patient selection, implant selection and survival, prediction of outcome, value-based health care, revision rate, patient safety, quality improvement, patient-reported outcomes and patient involvement. Several of the scheduled sessions put forward many crucial topics linked with our 2019 main theme to enhance the current knowledge in this specific area. Among these is the Michael Freeman Honorary Lecture entitled, “Lessons learned from the Australian Registries” presented by Dr. Richard De Steiger, as well as the Invited Nation Symposium that highlight the metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty outcomes and the remaining problems. These sessions highlight the involvement of a delegation from the Australian Orthopaedic Association (AOA) that will be able to enhance the scientific content of the meeting with its outstanding orthopaedic and trauma research and in-depth work in registries.

Moreover, the 2019 scientific program will promote broad exchanges around important questions like, “Do surgeons trust registry data?” and “How and when do registries make a difference?” But, it will also feature a symposium on non-arthroplasty registries to be organized and conducted by the active members of NORE.

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EFORT is convinced that “Registries & Impact on Practice” can bridge important components that affect members of the orthopaedic and trauma community, leading to long-term delivery of better health care and improvement in patients’ quality of life. Finally, and importantly, this key main theme will give to our attendees the chance to see the latest products related to joint arthroplasty from our industry partners in the exhibition area.