In the Journals

Patient-reported outcome measures, patient satisfaction had weak correlation after TJA

With a finding of weak to moderate correlation between patient-reported outcome measures and patient satisfaction, published results advise against overreliance of patient-reported outcome measures to assess patient outcomes after total joint arthroplasty if patient satisfaction is the desired outcome.

Researchers calculated correlation coefficients to quantify the relationship between patient satisfaction and prospectively collected patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) among 551 patients who underwent total joint hip or knee arthroplasty and completed a satisfaction survey at final follow-up. Researchers included the WOMAC index, SF-12, Oxford hip score, Knee Society clinical rating score, single assessment numerical evaluation (SANE) and University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) activity level rating in their PROM assessment.

Results showed patient satisfaction and PROMs had a weak to moderate correlation. Researchers found a higher correlation with patient satisfaction when querying the absolute postoperative scores vs. either preoperative score or net changes in scores. Researchers also noted a higher correlation with WOMAC index, Oxford hip score and Knee Society clinical rating score compared with the SF-12, UCLA activity level rating or SANE. The pain domain consistently carried the highest correlation with patient satisfaction within disease-specific PROMs, according to results.

“We recommend directly querying patients about satisfaction and using shorter PROMs, particularly disease-specific PROMs that assess pain perception to better gauge patient satisfaction,” the authors wrote. “If rankings and reimbursements are to be tied to PROMs, the usefulness of PROMs as indicators of quality of care need to be better elucidated.” – by Casey Tingle

 

Disclosures: Halawi reports he is a board or committee member for the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

With a finding of weak to moderate correlation between patient-reported outcome measures and patient satisfaction, published results advise against overreliance of patient-reported outcome measures to assess patient outcomes after total joint arthroplasty if patient satisfaction is the desired outcome.

Researchers calculated correlation coefficients to quantify the relationship between patient satisfaction and prospectively collected patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) among 551 patients who underwent total joint hip or knee arthroplasty and completed a satisfaction survey at final follow-up. Researchers included the WOMAC index, SF-12, Oxford hip score, Knee Society clinical rating score, single assessment numerical evaluation (SANE) and University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) activity level rating in their PROM assessment.

Results showed patient satisfaction and PROMs had a weak to moderate correlation. Researchers found a higher correlation with patient satisfaction when querying the absolute postoperative scores vs. either preoperative score or net changes in scores. Researchers also noted a higher correlation with WOMAC index, Oxford hip score and Knee Society clinical rating score compared with the SF-12, UCLA activity level rating or SANE. The pain domain consistently carried the highest correlation with patient satisfaction within disease-specific PROMs, according to results.

“We recommend directly querying patients about satisfaction and using shorter PROMs, particularly disease-specific PROMs that assess pain perception to better gauge patient satisfaction,” the authors wrote. “If rankings and reimbursements are to be tied to PROMs, the usefulness of PROMs as indicators of quality of care need to be better elucidated.” – by Casey Tingle

 

Disclosures: Halawi reports he is a board or committee member for the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.