In the Journals

Infection burden increases over 6 years in THA, TKA

Bryan D. Springer

Results from this study demonstrated the infection burden for total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty increased over 6 years among international arthroplasty registries.

“Despite efforts to try to reduce the incidence of periprosthetic infection, the most common cause of failure in total joint arthroplasty, the infection burden has not decreased or changed across multiple worldwide registries,” Bryan D. Springer, MD, told Healio.com/Orthopedics.

Researchers used data from six arthroplasty registries to determine the infection burden for total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) revisions performed during the last six years. The registries evaluated included the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry (AOANJR), New Zealand Joint Registry, Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register (SHAR), Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register (SKAR), National Joint Registry of England, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Isle of Man, and the American Joint Replacement Registry. Investigators also determined the number of revision and component removal for infection only for a case of infection where subsequent surgeries were performed on the same joint.

Findings showed the infection burden for THA in 2015 ranged from 0.76% in AOANJRR to 1.24% in SHAR, with a 97% unweighted average. Investigators noted the unweighted average in 2012, 2013, and 2014 for THA was 0.87%, 0.93% and 0.94%, respectively, which was higher compared with the unweighted averages of 2010 and 2011. Throughout the survey, the registries with 6-year data demonstrated the infection burden had increased.

According to the researchers, the infection burden for TKA for AOANJRR to SKAR ranged from 0.88% to 1.28%, with a 1.03% unweighted average. In 2012, 2013 and 2014, the unweighted average infection burden for TKA was 1.04%, 1.11% and 1.02%, respectively and was higher compared with 2010 and 2011. There was an increase in the infection burden observed over the course of the study in each of the registries. – by Monica Jaramillo

Disclosures: Springer reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the full study for a list of all other author’s relevant financial disclosures.

Bryan D. Springer

Results from this study demonstrated the infection burden for total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty increased over 6 years among international arthroplasty registries.

“Despite efforts to try to reduce the incidence of periprosthetic infection, the most common cause of failure in total joint arthroplasty, the infection burden has not decreased or changed across multiple worldwide registries,” Bryan D. Springer, MD, told Healio.com/Orthopedics.

Researchers used data from six arthroplasty registries to determine the infection burden for total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) revisions performed during the last six years. The registries evaluated included the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry (AOANJR), New Zealand Joint Registry, Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register (SHAR), Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register (SKAR), National Joint Registry of England, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Isle of Man, and the American Joint Replacement Registry. Investigators also determined the number of revision and component removal for infection only for a case of infection where subsequent surgeries were performed on the same joint.

Findings showed the infection burden for THA in 2015 ranged from 0.76% in AOANJRR to 1.24% in SHAR, with a 97% unweighted average. Investigators noted the unweighted average in 2012, 2013, and 2014 for THA was 0.87%, 0.93% and 0.94%, respectively, which was higher compared with the unweighted averages of 2010 and 2011. Throughout the survey, the registries with 6-year data demonstrated the infection burden had increased.

According to the researchers, the infection burden for TKA for AOANJRR to SKAR ranged from 0.88% to 1.28%, with a 1.03% unweighted average. In 2012, 2013 and 2014, the unweighted average infection burden for TKA was 1.04%, 1.11% and 1.02%, respectively and was higher compared with 2010 and 2011. There was an increase in the infection burden observed over the course of the study in each of the registries. – by Monica Jaramillo

Disclosures: Springer reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the full study for a list of all other author’s relevant financial disclosures.