In the Journals

Study: Aspirin effective in preventing symptomatic venous thromboembolic events in TJA

Recently published data showed that aspirin use as prophylaxis during revision total joint arthroplasty was more effective than warfarin in preventing symptomatic venous thromboembolic events and was associated with lower complications.

Researchers collected the incidence of symptomatic venous thromboembolic events, bleeding events, infection and mortality data from 2,997 patients who underwent revision total joint arthroplasty (TJA) and were treated with intermittent pneumatic compression devices and either aspirin or warfarin for venous thromboembolic event prophylaxis.

Javad Parvizi

Results showed a significantly higher incidence of symptomatic venous thromboembolic events among patients in the warfarin group vs. the aspirin group (1.75% vs. 0.56%). Researchers also noted a bleeding event rate of 1.5% among patients who received warfarin compared with a rate of 0.4% among patients who received aspirin. However, patients in both groups had similar rates of surgical site infection, according to results. Researchers found patient age was a significant predictor for risk for venous thromboembolic events, with an estimated 44% increase in risk for venous thromboembolic event corresponding with a 10-year difference, while risk for venous thromboembolic events, major bleeding and mortality were significantly predicted by Charlson Comorbidity Index. – by Casey Tingle

Disclosures: Deirmengian reports he receives royalties, research support and other financial material support from and is on the speakers bureau for CD Diagnostics, Synthes, Zimmer, Biomet, Angiotech and Biostar Ventures; is a paid employee for CD Diagnostics, Synthes, Zimmer, Biomet, Angiotech, Biostar Ventures, Trice and Lankenau Institute of Medical Research; has stock or stock options for CD Diagnostics, Synthes, Zimmer, Biomet, Angiotech, Biostar Ventures, Trice, Domain and Lankenau Institute of Medical Research; and receives royalties, financial or material support from the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

Recently published data showed that aspirin use as prophylaxis during revision total joint arthroplasty was more effective than warfarin in preventing symptomatic venous thromboembolic events and was associated with lower complications.

Researchers collected the incidence of symptomatic venous thromboembolic events, bleeding events, infection and mortality data from 2,997 patients who underwent revision total joint arthroplasty (TJA) and were treated with intermittent pneumatic compression devices and either aspirin or warfarin for venous thromboembolic event prophylaxis.

Javad Parvizi

Results showed a significantly higher incidence of symptomatic venous thromboembolic events among patients in the warfarin group vs. the aspirin group (1.75% vs. 0.56%). Researchers also noted a bleeding event rate of 1.5% among patients who received warfarin compared with a rate of 0.4% among patients who received aspirin. However, patients in both groups had similar rates of surgical site infection, according to results. Researchers found patient age was a significant predictor for risk for venous thromboembolic events, with an estimated 44% increase in risk for venous thromboembolic event corresponding with a 10-year difference, while risk for venous thromboembolic events, major bleeding and mortality were significantly predicted by Charlson Comorbidity Index. – by Casey Tingle

Disclosures: Deirmengian reports he receives royalties, research support and other financial material support from and is on the speakers bureau for CD Diagnostics, Synthes, Zimmer, Biomet, Angiotech and Biostar Ventures; is a paid employee for CD Diagnostics, Synthes, Zimmer, Biomet, Angiotech, Biostar Ventures, Trice and Lankenau Institute of Medical Research; has stock or stock options for CD Diagnostics, Synthes, Zimmer, Biomet, Angiotech, Biostar Ventures, Trice, Domain and Lankenau Institute of Medical Research; and receives royalties, financial or material support from the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.