In the Journals

Greater rates of readmission, reoperation found after THA vs TKA

Results published in The Journal of Arthroplasty showed patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty experienced greater rates of readmission and reoperation at 30-days compared with patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty.

Wael K. Barsoum , MD, and colleagues compared length of stay, discharge disposition and 30-day readmission, reoperation and complication rates between 94,326 patients who underwent THA and 147,160 patients who underwent TKA between 2011 and 2015.

Wael K. Barsoum

Results showed patients who underwent THA and TKA had a similar length of stay and discharge disposition after adjusting for baseline characteristics. However, researchers noted patients who underwent THA experienced greater 30-day rates of readmission and reoperation.

According to results, seven of the 18 complications evaluated in the study occurred in more patients who underwent THA vs. three complications which occurred more in patients who underwent TKA. The occurrence of eight other complications were not different between the THA and TKA groups. Patients who underwent THA experienced greater risks for superficial infection, periprosthetic infection, sepsis and transfusion, researchers found, while risks of wound dehiscence, deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism were lower after THA.

“Patients who had total hip arthroplasties had higher 30-day readmission and reoperation rates compared with patients who had total knee arthroplasty,” Barsoum told Healio.com/Orthopedics. “Since there is considerable variation in complications, rehabilitation protocols and readmission rates among hospitals in the United States, all of which can result in higher costs, standardized pricing for total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty may be inappropriate. A thorough understanding of patient-level and population-level risks associated with these procedures is key to assessing the feasibility of alternative payment models.” – by Casey Tingle

 

Disclosures: Barsoum reports he receives royalties from Stryker, Exactech, Zimmer and Custom Orthopedic Solutions; is a paid consultant for Stryker and KEF healthcare; has stock or stock options in iVHR, Custom Orthopedic Solutions, Otismed and Peerwell; receives research support from Zimmer, DJO and Orthosensor; and receives other financial or material support from KEF healthcare. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

Results published in The Journal of Arthroplasty showed patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty experienced greater rates of readmission and reoperation at 30-days compared with patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty.

Wael K. Barsoum , MD, and colleagues compared length of stay, discharge disposition and 30-day readmission, reoperation and complication rates between 94,326 patients who underwent THA and 147,160 patients who underwent TKA between 2011 and 2015.

Wael K. Barsoum

Results showed patients who underwent THA and TKA had a similar length of stay and discharge disposition after adjusting for baseline characteristics. However, researchers noted patients who underwent THA experienced greater 30-day rates of readmission and reoperation.

According to results, seven of the 18 complications evaluated in the study occurred in more patients who underwent THA vs. three complications which occurred more in patients who underwent TKA. The occurrence of eight other complications were not different between the THA and TKA groups. Patients who underwent THA experienced greater risks for superficial infection, periprosthetic infection, sepsis and transfusion, researchers found, while risks of wound dehiscence, deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism were lower after THA.

“Patients who had total hip arthroplasties had higher 30-day readmission and reoperation rates compared with patients who had total knee arthroplasty,” Barsoum told Healio.com/Orthopedics. “Since there is considerable variation in complications, rehabilitation protocols and readmission rates among hospitals in the United States, all of which can result in higher costs, standardized pricing for total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty may be inappropriate. A thorough understanding of patient-level and population-level risks associated with these procedures is key to assessing the feasibility of alternative payment models.” – by Casey Tingle

 

Disclosures: Barsoum reports he receives royalties from Stryker, Exactech, Zimmer and Custom Orthopedic Solutions; is a paid consultant for Stryker and KEF healthcare; has stock or stock options in iVHR, Custom Orthopedic Solutions, Otismed and Peerwell; receives research support from Zimmer, DJO and Orthosensor; and receives other financial or material support from KEF healthcare. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.