From OT Europe

NJR launches new model for how it monitors implant, hospital, surgeon performance

The orthopedic joint replacement registry for England, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Isle of Man has launched the new accountability and transparency model for how it monitors implant, hospital and surgeon performance.

According to a release from the National Joint Registry (NJR), the model is structured across fives processes and defines roles and responsibilities to monitor orthopedic “near events,” implant, hospital and surgeon performance, and surgeons’ individual opinions on their practice. According to a guest NJR blog entry regarding the accountability and transparency model by the NJR medical director Martyn L. Porter, FRCS, alert notifications will let surgeons know of deteriorating outcomes at an earlier stage, to prevent surgeons from becoming “alarm” or outlier status. “This enables surgeons to correct substandard practices and reduce or eliminate poor outcomes,” he wrote. This function will extend at the hospital level to reduce or eliminate poor outcomes in joint replacement.

Martyn L. Porter

One of the five processes of the model, the NJR’s surgeon appraisal enhancement process offers joint replacement surgeons the opportunity to formally record that they have reviewed their NJR data as part of their appraisal and revalidation.

“It has never been more important to ensure that anyone who chooses to have a joint replacement procedure has the right to safe care,” Porter said in the release.  “Now with close to 2.5 million records, the NJR’s role in monitoring implant, hospital and surgeon performance remains of vital importance.  The strengthened partnerships developed through the NJR’s accountability and transparency model will drive even greater patient safety and quality of care for joint replacement patients.”

In the guest blog Porter wrote, “It is important that the public has confidence that all surgeons who carry out joint replacement procedures review their performance data in a structured and accountable way.  We are at an exciting juncture and once implemented, it will be ground-breaking for the NHS and for patient safety and reassurance.”

 

Reference:

www.njrcentre.org.uk

The orthopedic joint replacement registry for England, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Isle of Man has launched the new accountability and transparency model for how it monitors implant, hospital and surgeon performance.

According to a release from the National Joint Registry (NJR), the model is structured across fives processes and defines roles and responsibilities to monitor orthopedic “near events,” implant, hospital and surgeon performance, and surgeons’ individual opinions on their practice. According to a guest NJR blog entry regarding the accountability and transparency model by the NJR medical director Martyn L. Porter, FRCS, alert notifications will let surgeons know of deteriorating outcomes at an earlier stage, to prevent surgeons from becoming “alarm” or outlier status. “This enables surgeons to correct substandard practices and reduce or eliminate poor outcomes,” he wrote. This function will extend at the hospital level to reduce or eliminate poor outcomes in joint replacement.

Martyn L. Porter

One of the five processes of the model, the NJR’s surgeon appraisal enhancement process offers joint replacement surgeons the opportunity to formally record that they have reviewed their NJR data as part of their appraisal and revalidation.

“It has never been more important to ensure that anyone who chooses to have a joint replacement procedure has the right to safe care,” Porter said in the release.  “Now with close to 2.5 million records, the NJR’s role in monitoring implant, hospital and surgeon performance remains of vital importance.  The strengthened partnerships developed through the NJR’s accountability and transparency model will drive even greater patient safety and quality of care for joint replacement patients.”

In the guest blog Porter wrote, “It is important that the public has confidence that all surgeons who carry out joint replacement procedures review their performance data in a structured and accountable way.  We are at an exciting juncture and once implemented, it will be ground-breaking for the NHS and for patient safety and reassurance.”

 

Reference:

www.njrcentre.org.uk