Meeting News CoverageFrom OT Europe

Newer UKR prosthesis for patients with OA achieved satisfactory short-term results

LIVERPOOL, United Kingdom — Patients who received a newer prosthesis similar to the Miller-Galante knee design showed significantly better Knee Society function scores than patients who had a long-used prosthesis to which it was compared. However, the two implants performed about the same at short-term follow-up, according to a presenter here at the British Orthopaedic Association Annual Meeting.

In a study of 81 unicompartmental knee replacements (UKR) performed in 67 consecutive patients with osteoarthritis, Alan Howieson, FRCs (T&O), and colleagues analyzed outcomes for the Zimmer Unicompartmental High-Flex Knee System (ZUK), and compared the outcomes to those for patients who had received the Oxford Partial Knee Replacement (Biomet). Two senior surgeons performed all the procedures between 2005 and 2013. Howieson said there were mainly no clinically detectable differences between the two groups preoperatively.

Howieson reported a mean maximum flexion of 132° for the ZUK and 126° for the Oxford UKR group. The researchers found no significant difference in revision rate, and no revisions were required in the ZUK group. Three patients in the Oxford group were revised early to total knee replacements.

“The functional outcomes of ZUK were good at short- to mid-term follow-up. It is at least equivalent to the Oxford knee,” Howieson said.

Howieson noted 100% follow-up of the patients in the ZUK group was possible. In the Oxford UKR group, four patients were lost to follow-up (five knees) and one patient died. – by Susan M. Rapp

Reference:

Howieson A, et al. Paper #561. Presented at: British Orthopaedic Association Annual Congress; Sept. 15-18, 2015; Liverpool, United Kingdom.

Disclosure: Howieson reports no relevant financial disclosures.

LIVERPOOL, United Kingdom — Patients who received a newer prosthesis similar to the Miller-Galante knee design showed significantly better Knee Society function scores than patients who had a long-used prosthesis to which it was compared. However, the two implants performed about the same at short-term follow-up, according to a presenter here at the British Orthopaedic Association Annual Meeting.

In a study of 81 unicompartmental knee replacements (UKR) performed in 67 consecutive patients with osteoarthritis, Alan Howieson, FRCs (T&O), and colleagues analyzed outcomes for the Zimmer Unicompartmental High-Flex Knee System (ZUK), and compared the outcomes to those for patients who had received the Oxford Partial Knee Replacement (Biomet). Two senior surgeons performed all the procedures between 2005 and 2013. Howieson said there were mainly no clinically detectable differences between the two groups preoperatively.

Howieson reported a mean maximum flexion of 132° for the ZUK and 126° for the Oxford UKR group. The researchers found no significant difference in revision rate, and no revisions were required in the ZUK group. Three patients in the Oxford group were revised early to total knee replacements.

“The functional outcomes of ZUK were good at short- to mid-term follow-up. It is at least equivalent to the Oxford knee,” Howieson said.

Howieson noted 100% follow-up of the patients in the ZUK group was possible. In the Oxford UKR group, four patients were lost to follow-up (five knees) and one patient died. – by Susan M. Rapp

Reference:

Howieson A, et al. Paper #561. Presented at: British Orthopaedic Association Annual Congress; Sept. 15-18, 2015; Liverpool, United Kingdom.

Disclosure: Howieson reports no relevant financial disclosures.