In the Journals

High school lacrosse injuries vary by athletic activity level, gender

Among high school-aged athletes who sustained lacrosse injuries, injury rates and patterns tended to vary based on athletes’ sex and level of play, according to study results.

Researchers collected lacrosse injury and exposure data from the High School Reporting Information Online database for a large sample of high schools over 4 academic years.

In all, 1,406 lacrosse injuries were recorded during 716,812 athlete exposures (AEs) for an overall injury rate of 1.96 per 1,000 AEs. Injury rates were higher in competition than practice (3.61 vs. 1.23) and among boys compared with girls (2.26 vs. 1.54), according to the researchers.

Contact with another athlete and no contact were the most common catalysts for injury in boys, whereas in girls, the most common catalysts were no contact and contact with a playing apparatus.

The injuries most frequently diagnosed were sprains/strains and concussions. Most common locations of competition-related injury were the head/face, lower leg/ankle/foot and knee, whereas the most common practice-related injury locations were the lower leg/ankle/foot, head/face and knee.

The researchers reported that 71.8% of athletes returned to play in 3 weeks or less. Surgical intervention was necessary in 6.9% of injuries, according to the researchers.

Disclosure: This study was funded in part by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention grants R49/CE000674-01 and R49/CE001172-01. Research funding was also received from the National Federation of State High School Associations, National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment, DonJoy Orthotics, and EyeBlack.

Among high school-aged athletes who sustained lacrosse injuries, injury rates and patterns tended to vary based on athletes’ sex and level of play, according to study results.

Researchers collected lacrosse injury and exposure data from the High School Reporting Information Online database for a large sample of high schools over 4 academic years.

In all, 1,406 lacrosse injuries were recorded during 716,812 athlete exposures (AEs) for an overall injury rate of 1.96 per 1,000 AEs. Injury rates were higher in competition than practice (3.61 vs. 1.23) and among boys compared with girls (2.26 vs. 1.54), according to the researchers.

Contact with another athlete and no contact were the most common catalysts for injury in boys, whereas in girls, the most common catalysts were no contact and contact with a playing apparatus.

The injuries most frequently diagnosed were sprains/strains and concussions. Most common locations of competition-related injury were the head/face, lower leg/ankle/foot and knee, whereas the most common practice-related injury locations were the lower leg/ankle/foot, head/face and knee.

The researchers reported that 71.8% of athletes returned to play in 3 weeks or less. Surgical intervention was necessary in 6.9% of injuries, according to the researchers.

Disclosure: This study was funded in part by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention grants R49/CE000674-01 and R49/CE001172-01. Research funding was also received from the National Federation of State High School Associations, National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment, DonJoy Orthotics, and EyeBlack.