Meeting News Coverage

Ankle sleeves, lace-up braces may improve neuromuscular control during Drop Vertical Jump test

ORLANDO, Fla. — When using ankle sleeves and lace-up braces, athletes showed improvements in neuromuscular control while performing the Drop Vertical Jump test. Additionally, ankle torque decreased during 45° bounding maneuvers, and no deficits in performance time were observed when compared with control during cutting maneuvers, according to study data presented here.

Researchers chose 10 athletes without musculoskeletal injuries history for inclusion in the study. Athletes had to perform the Drop Vertical Jump test (DVJ), a 45° bound and cutting maneuvers while wearing no brace, and then again while wearing a silicone ankle sleeve (SAS) and a lace-up ankle brace (LAB). DVJ was utilized to determine neuromuscular control, whereas the 45° bound and cutting were utilized to assess athletic performance.

The researchers used markerless motion-capture technology to collect data. Knee flexion, hip internal rotation and dynamic valgus were measured at contact and loading phases of landing during the DVJ, and ankle torque was measured during the 45° bound. Additionally, performance time was recorded for cutting of the dominant pivot foot.

During both phases of the DVJ, hip internal rotation, ankle torque and ankle range of motion significantly decreased with the use of both the SAS and LAB, according to the researchers. Further, both SAS and LAB increased knee flexion at initial contact compared with the control group.

Braces did not have a significant effect on dynamic knee valgus, and no difference was observed for any of the parameters between SAS and LAB, according to the researchers.

Ankle torque was significantly reduced in athletes with the use of either the SAS or LAB compared with the control group for the 45° bound, but there was no significant effect on timed cutting maneuvers compared with control with the use of SAS or LAB. – by Monica Jaramillo

Reference:

Sherman SL, et al. Paper #15. Presented at: American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting; July 7-12, 2015; Orlando, Fla.

Disclosures: Sherman reports he is a paid consultant for Arthrex, Neotis and Regeneration Technologies. He also receives research support from Arthrex, is part of the editorial / governing board for American Journal of Orthopedics and Arthroscopy and is a member of the board / committee of American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy Association of North America. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

ORLANDO, Fla. — When using ankle sleeves and lace-up braces, athletes showed improvements in neuromuscular control while performing the Drop Vertical Jump test. Additionally, ankle torque decreased during 45° bounding maneuvers, and no deficits in performance time were observed when compared with control during cutting maneuvers, according to study data presented here.

Researchers chose 10 athletes without musculoskeletal injuries history for inclusion in the study. Athletes had to perform the Drop Vertical Jump test (DVJ), a 45° bound and cutting maneuvers while wearing no brace, and then again while wearing a silicone ankle sleeve (SAS) and a lace-up ankle brace (LAB). DVJ was utilized to determine neuromuscular control, whereas the 45° bound and cutting were utilized to assess athletic performance.

The researchers used markerless motion-capture technology to collect data. Knee flexion, hip internal rotation and dynamic valgus were measured at contact and loading phases of landing during the DVJ, and ankle torque was measured during the 45° bound. Additionally, performance time was recorded for cutting of the dominant pivot foot.

During both phases of the DVJ, hip internal rotation, ankle torque and ankle range of motion significantly decreased with the use of both the SAS and LAB, according to the researchers. Further, both SAS and LAB increased knee flexion at initial contact compared with the control group.

Braces did not have a significant effect on dynamic knee valgus, and no difference was observed for any of the parameters between SAS and LAB, according to the researchers.

Ankle torque was significantly reduced in athletes with the use of either the SAS or LAB compared with the control group for the 45° bound, but there was no significant effect on timed cutting maneuvers compared with control with the use of SAS or LAB. – by Monica Jaramillo

Reference:

Sherman SL, et al. Paper #15. Presented at: American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting; July 7-12, 2015; Orlando, Fla.

Disclosures: Sherman reports he is a paid consultant for Arthrex, Neotis and Regeneration Technologies. He also receives research support from Arthrex, is part of the editorial / governing board for American Journal of Orthopedics and Arthroscopy and is a member of the board / committee of American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy Association of North America. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

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