In the Journals

Multipoint stem cells effective in treating large chondral knee defects

Use of multipoint stem cells proved to be effective for the treatment of large chondral knee defects and surgery with these cells can be performed routinely in clinical practice, according to researchers of this study.

Researchers conducted a minimum 3-year follow-up of 25 patients with symptomatic large chondral defects of the knee who underwent cartilage transplantation with multipoint stem cells (MSCs) and a collagen type I/III matrix. Eighteen patients had co-existing injuries that were also treated during the surgical procedure, and all patients underwent a standard postoperative rehabilitation program. Preoperative and postoperative evaluations at 1-year, 2-year and final follow-up included radiographs, MRI, IKDC, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Lysholm, Marx, Tegner and visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores.

When compared with preoperative scores, patients showed significant improvement in Tegner, Marx, Lysholm, VAS, IKDC subjective and KOOS measures at final follow-up. Researchers found better outcomes among patients younger than 45 years and patients with smaller or single lesions, while hyaline-like cartilage was found in the histological analysis of the biopsied tissue. Ninety-two percent of patients experienced moderate to severe pain preoperatively; however, eight patients reported mild pain at final follow-up. While all participants returned to their previous daily and specific sport activities, 32% were able to perform at their preinjury levels at final follow-up, according to study results.

MRI scans showed good stability of the implant and complete filling of the defect in 80% of patients, according to study results, and no adverse reactions of postoperative complications were noted.

Disclosure: The researchers have no relevant financial disclosures.

Use of multipoint stem cells proved to be effective for the treatment of large chondral knee defects and surgery with these cells can be performed routinely in clinical practice, according to researchers of this study.

Researchers conducted a minimum 3-year follow-up of 25 patients with symptomatic large chondral defects of the knee who underwent cartilage transplantation with multipoint stem cells (MSCs) and a collagen type I/III matrix. Eighteen patients had co-existing injuries that were also treated during the surgical procedure, and all patients underwent a standard postoperative rehabilitation program. Preoperative and postoperative evaluations at 1-year, 2-year and final follow-up included radiographs, MRI, IKDC, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Lysholm, Marx, Tegner and visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores.

When compared with preoperative scores, patients showed significant improvement in Tegner, Marx, Lysholm, VAS, IKDC subjective and KOOS measures at final follow-up. Researchers found better outcomes among patients younger than 45 years and patients with smaller or single lesions, while hyaline-like cartilage was found in the histological analysis of the biopsied tissue. Ninety-two percent of patients experienced moderate to severe pain preoperatively; however, eight patients reported mild pain at final follow-up. While all participants returned to their previous daily and specific sport activities, 32% were able to perform at their preinjury levels at final follow-up, according to study results.

MRI scans showed good stability of the implant and complete filling of the defect in 80% of patients, according to study results, and no adverse reactions of postoperative complications were noted.

Disclosure: The researchers have no relevant financial disclosures.