In the Journals

Male track and field athletes at greater risk of injury

Compared with other sexes and competition levels, male track and field athletes, particularly masters male athletes, are at a greater risk of injury, according to researchers.

During the course of a 3-year period, the researchers recorded 436 injuries sustained by 48,473 competing athletes participating in the Penn Relays Carnival who were treated by the medical staff. The researchers determined the absolute number of injuries and relative injury rates and calculated odds ratios of injury rates between sexes, competition levels and events. Additionally, the researchers classified the injuries as major or minor medical or orthopedic injuries.

Results showed minor orthopedic injuries had the greatest relative rate of injury subtypes, followed by minor medical injuries, major medical injuries and major orthopedic injuries. The lowest relative injury rate was observed among college and elite athletes compared with high school and masters athletes.

Although male athletes displayed a greater likelihood of having a minor orthopedic injury vs. female athletes, they were less likely to sustain a major medical injury, according to the researchers. Overall, the researchers found the 4 x 400-m relay had the greatest relative injury rate vs. the 4 x 100-m and 4 x 200-m relays. – by Casey Tingle

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

Compared with other sexes and competition levels, male track and field athletes, particularly masters male athletes, are at a greater risk of injury, according to researchers.

During the course of a 3-year period, the researchers recorded 436 injuries sustained by 48,473 competing athletes participating in the Penn Relays Carnival who were treated by the medical staff. The researchers determined the absolute number of injuries and relative injury rates and calculated odds ratios of injury rates between sexes, competition levels and events. Additionally, the researchers classified the injuries as major or minor medical or orthopedic injuries.

Results showed minor orthopedic injuries had the greatest relative rate of injury subtypes, followed by minor medical injuries, major medical injuries and major orthopedic injuries. The lowest relative injury rate was observed among college and elite athletes compared with high school and masters athletes.

Although male athletes displayed a greater likelihood of having a minor orthopedic injury vs. female athletes, they were less likely to sustain a major medical injury, according to the researchers. Overall, the researchers found the 4 x 400-m relay had the greatest relative injury rate vs. the 4 x 100-m and 4 x 200-m relays. – by Casey Tingle

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.