Meeting News

Similar outcomes seen with knotless vs knot-tying anchors for arthroscopic repair of glenohumeral instability

Isabella T. Wu

LAS VEGAS — Knotless anchors compared with conventional anchors used in arthroscopic anterior labral repair for glenohumeral instability showed comparable and satisfactory redislocation rates, as well as lower recurrent subluxation rates, according to a presentation at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting.

“We showed Bankart repairs with knotless suture anchors can effectively and durably address recurrent anterior instability,” Isabella T. Wu, BA, said during her presentation. “Patients achieve good to excellent functional outcomes with both knotless and knot-tying anchor repairs.”

Wu and colleagues identified 102 patients who underwent arthroscopic anterior labral repair for recurrent glenohumeral instability. Knotless anchors were used in 34 patients, while conventional knot-tying anchors were used in 68 patients in the control group. Data from medical records and patient-reported outcomes were used to perform statistical comparisons between the treatment groups.

Results showed no significant difference in the rate of redislocation between patents who underwent surgery with the knotless anchors compared with patients who underwent surgery with knot-tying anchors. However, patents who underwent surgery with the knot-tying anchors had a significantly higher recurrent subluxation rate. At a mean of 2.9 years, 12 revision shoulder surgeries were performed in patients who underwent surgery with the knot-tying anchors. There was one revision at 1.4 years in the group that underwent surgery with knotless anchors.

Treatment groups were not different with regard to final mean VAS, single assessment numerical evaluation, QuickDASH, University of California, Los Angeles shoulder and Rowe scores. However, the mean VAS at rest was higher in the knotless anchor group, with a score of 0.7 vs. 0.1 – by Monica Jaramillo

 

Reference:

Wu IT, et al. Paper 32. Presented at: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting; March 12-16, 2019; Las Vegas.

 

Disclosure: Wu reports no relevant financial disclosures.

Isabella T. Wu

LAS VEGAS — Knotless anchors compared with conventional anchors used in arthroscopic anterior labral repair for glenohumeral instability showed comparable and satisfactory redislocation rates, as well as lower recurrent subluxation rates, according to a presentation at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting.

“We showed Bankart repairs with knotless suture anchors can effectively and durably address recurrent anterior instability,” Isabella T. Wu, BA, said during her presentation. “Patients achieve good to excellent functional outcomes with both knotless and knot-tying anchor repairs.”

Wu and colleagues identified 102 patients who underwent arthroscopic anterior labral repair for recurrent glenohumeral instability. Knotless anchors were used in 34 patients, while conventional knot-tying anchors were used in 68 patients in the control group. Data from medical records and patient-reported outcomes were used to perform statistical comparisons between the treatment groups.

Results showed no significant difference in the rate of redislocation between patents who underwent surgery with the knotless anchors compared with patients who underwent surgery with knot-tying anchors. However, patents who underwent surgery with the knot-tying anchors had a significantly higher recurrent subluxation rate. At a mean of 2.9 years, 12 revision shoulder surgeries were performed in patients who underwent surgery with the knot-tying anchors. There was one revision at 1.4 years in the group that underwent surgery with knotless anchors.

Treatment groups were not different with regard to final mean VAS, single assessment numerical evaluation, QuickDASH, University of California, Los Angeles shoulder and Rowe scores. However, the mean VAS at rest was higher in the knotless anchor group, with a score of 0.7 vs. 0.1 – by Monica Jaramillo

 

Reference:

Wu IT, et al. Paper 32. Presented at: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting; March 12-16, 2019; Las Vegas.

 

Disclosure: Wu reports no relevant financial disclosures.

    See more from American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting