In the Journals

Findings support efficacy of ACL Injury Risk Estimation Quiz

The ACL Injury Risk Estimation Quiz is an efficient approach for evaluating individual differences for estimating ACL injury risk factors, according to study results.

“The results provide evidence that some individuals have the ability to visually estimate ACL injury risk factors more accurately than other instrument-based ACL risk estimation methods (i.e., ACL nomogram),” the researchers wrote. “The [ACL Injury Risk Estimation Quiz] ACL-IQ provides the foundation for assessing the efficacy of observational ACL injury risk factor assessment (i.e., Does simple skilled visual inspection reduce ACL injuries?).”

Researchers collected data from 660 participants who took the computerized ACL-IQ. Participants included an exercise science group of professionals in that field and a general population group of non-exercise scientists.

Participants were asked to estimate future ACL injury risks on a 10-point scale while watching 3-second videotaped clips of athletes doing a drop vertical jump. Estimations were made using 3-D biochemical analysis of peak knee abduction. Assessment efficiency and validity was analyzed for

item reduction, reliability analysis, cross-validation, convergent and discriminating validity. Findings showed most participants had high consistency levels; however exercise professionals had higher levels of consistency than general population.  Questions were answered correctly by 74% of the exercise science group and 54% of the general population. Differences were not significant between the sample groups with regards to effect size for cross-validation. No group scored 100%.

Factors significantly correlated with performance on the ACL-IQ were ACL knowledge, education level, knee/thigh motion and jump height cue utility variables. Height, weight, jump height and alignment were significant task-irrelevant cues. Personality had no correlation with the ACL-IQ.

Video clips were correctly categorized into the high- and low-risk categories for injury by 35% of the exercise science group and 4% of general population.  The total cohort overall performed 23% better than or equal to the ACL nomogram, with 40% of the exercise science group performing better than or equal to the ACL nomogram compared with 6% of the general population, according to researchers. ‒ by Monica Jaramillo

Disclosures: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

The ACL Injury Risk Estimation Quiz is an efficient approach for evaluating individual differences for estimating ACL injury risk factors, according to study results.

“The results provide evidence that some individuals have the ability to visually estimate ACL injury risk factors more accurately than other instrument-based ACL risk estimation methods (i.e., ACL nomogram),” the researchers wrote. “The [ACL Injury Risk Estimation Quiz] ACL-IQ provides the foundation for assessing the efficacy of observational ACL injury risk factor assessment (i.e., Does simple skilled visual inspection reduce ACL injuries?).”

Researchers collected data from 660 participants who took the computerized ACL-IQ. Participants included an exercise science group of professionals in that field and a general population group of non-exercise scientists.

Participants were asked to estimate future ACL injury risks on a 10-point scale while watching 3-second videotaped clips of athletes doing a drop vertical jump. Estimations were made using 3-D biochemical analysis of peak knee abduction. Assessment efficiency and validity was analyzed for

item reduction, reliability analysis, cross-validation, convergent and discriminating validity. Findings showed most participants had high consistency levels; however exercise professionals had higher levels of consistency than general population.  Questions were answered correctly by 74% of the exercise science group and 54% of the general population. Differences were not significant between the sample groups with regards to effect size for cross-validation. No group scored 100%.

Factors significantly correlated with performance on the ACL-IQ were ACL knowledge, education level, knee/thigh motion and jump height cue utility variables. Height, weight, jump height and alignment were significant task-irrelevant cues. Personality had no correlation with the ACL-IQ.

Video clips were correctly categorized into the high- and low-risk categories for injury by 35% of the exercise science group and 4% of general population.  The total cohort overall performed 23% better than or equal to the ACL nomogram, with 40% of the exercise science group performing better than or equal to the ACL nomogram compared with 6% of the general population, according to researchers. ‒ by Monica Jaramillo

Disclosures: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.