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Depression seen in nearly half of young athletes who undergo arthroscopic shoulder stabilization

Danielle G. Weekes

LAS VEGAS — Approximately half of patients who underwent arthroscopic shoulder stabilization demonstrated symptoms of major depressive disorder during a 1-year study, according to a presenter, here. Findings also showed symptomatic depression positively correlated with a decrease in shoulder outcome functionality.

“Worse functional outcomes are not correlated with preoperative shoulder function, but they are correlated with depressive symptomology in their preoperative phase,” study co-author Danielle G. Weekes, MD, said during her presentation. “Although both patients did well after surgery, the patients that did not show any depressive symptomology did drastically better than the patients in the depressive cohort. Even though at the 1-year postoperative point 27% of patients were still depressed, that is still three-times the national average what Americans are reporting being depressed.”

Weekes and colleagues identified 94 young, athletic patients who underwent primary arthroscopic shoulder stabilization. At 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months and 1 year, patients were queried. Among the functional outcome scores assessed were the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomology (QIDS-SR16) and the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability (WOSI) index. For a patient to be diagnosed with major depressive disorder, the validated minimum QIDS-SR16 score was 6 or higher. Investigators grouped patients based on the presence of preoperative major depressive disorder. Forty-seven patients were placed in the major depressive disorder group and 47 patients were in the non-major depressive disorder group.

Results showed the baseline average WOSI scores for patients with major depressive disorder was 64.5% and was 54.6% for the non-major depressive disorder group. Investigators noted a downward trend in WOSI scores during the study period for both cohorts apart from the 6-week follow-up. WOSI scores reportedly increased among the recreation/work and lifestyle categories. The WOSI at 6 months for the non-major depressive disorder group was 19.6% and was 30.7% for patients with major depressive disorder.

At 6 weeks, the QIDS-SR16 score increased from baseline and was 5.68 for the non-major depressive disorder group and was 9.98 for patients with major depressive disorder. However, during the rest of the study period, the QIDS-SR16 score decreased to final score of 1.98 for the non-major depressive disorder group and was 6.4 for patients with major depressive disorder. – by Monica Jaramillo

 

Reference:

Weekes DG, et al. Paper 36. Presented at: the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting; March 12-16, 2019; Las Vegas.

 

Disclosure: Weekes reports no relevant financial disclosures.

Danielle G. Weekes

LAS VEGAS — Approximately half of patients who underwent arthroscopic shoulder stabilization demonstrated symptoms of major depressive disorder during a 1-year study, according to a presenter, here. Findings also showed symptomatic depression positively correlated with a decrease in shoulder outcome functionality.

“Worse functional outcomes are not correlated with preoperative shoulder function, but they are correlated with depressive symptomology in their preoperative phase,” study co-author Danielle G. Weekes, MD, said during her presentation. “Although both patients did well after surgery, the patients that did not show any depressive symptomology did drastically better than the patients in the depressive cohort. Even though at the 1-year postoperative point 27% of patients were still depressed, that is still three-times the national average what Americans are reporting being depressed.”

Weekes and colleagues identified 94 young, athletic patients who underwent primary arthroscopic shoulder stabilization. At 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months and 1 year, patients were queried. Among the functional outcome scores assessed were the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomology (QIDS-SR16) and the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability (WOSI) index. For a patient to be diagnosed with major depressive disorder, the validated minimum QIDS-SR16 score was 6 or higher. Investigators grouped patients based on the presence of preoperative major depressive disorder. Forty-seven patients were placed in the major depressive disorder group and 47 patients were in the non-major depressive disorder group.

Results showed the baseline average WOSI scores for patients with major depressive disorder was 64.5% and was 54.6% for the non-major depressive disorder group. Investigators noted a downward trend in WOSI scores during the study period for both cohorts apart from the 6-week follow-up. WOSI scores reportedly increased among the recreation/work and lifestyle categories. The WOSI at 6 months for the non-major depressive disorder group was 19.6% and was 30.7% for patients with major depressive disorder.

At 6 weeks, the QIDS-SR16 score increased from baseline and was 5.68 for the non-major depressive disorder group and was 9.98 for patients with major depressive disorder. However, during the rest of the study period, the QIDS-SR16 score decreased to final score of 1.98 for the non-major depressive disorder group and was 6.4 for patients with major depressive disorder. – by Monica Jaramillo

 

Reference:

Weekes DG, et al. Paper 36. Presented at: the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting; March 12-16, 2019; Las Vegas.

 

Disclosure: Weekes reports no relevant financial disclosures.

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