In the Journals

Gait retraining program may reduce risk of injury in novice runners

According to a recently published study from the American Journal of Sports Medicine, a 2-week gait retraining program for novice runners showed efficacy for reducing impact loading.

Researchers performed a baseline running biomechanics evaluation for 320 novice runners by using an instrumented treadmill on which participants ran in their usual running shoes at 8 km/h and 12 km/h. Investigators randomized 166 participants to receive 2 weeks of gait retraining with real-time visual feedback and randomized 154 participants received treadmill running exercise without visual feedback. After the training, investigators reassessed participants’ running mechanics. An online surveillance program was used to assess participants’ 12-month post-training injury profiles.

Results showed vertical loading rates at both testing speeds significantly decreased in participants who received gait retraining, while loading rates were the same or slightly increased in those in the control group. The occurrence of running-related musculoskeletal injury at the 12-month follow-up in the gait training group and the control group was 16% and 38%, respectively. There was a hazard ratio of 0.38 between participants in the gait retraining group and those in the control group. This demonstrated gait-trained runners had a 62% lower risk of injury vs. controls, according to researchers. – by Monica Jaramillo

 

Disclosures: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

According to a recently published study from the American Journal of Sports Medicine, a 2-week gait retraining program for novice runners showed efficacy for reducing impact loading.

Researchers performed a baseline running biomechanics evaluation for 320 novice runners by using an instrumented treadmill on which participants ran in their usual running shoes at 8 km/h and 12 km/h. Investigators randomized 166 participants to receive 2 weeks of gait retraining with real-time visual feedback and randomized 154 participants received treadmill running exercise without visual feedback. After the training, investigators reassessed participants’ running mechanics. An online surveillance program was used to assess participants’ 12-month post-training injury profiles.

Results showed vertical loading rates at both testing speeds significantly decreased in participants who received gait retraining, while loading rates were the same or slightly increased in those in the control group. The occurrence of running-related musculoskeletal injury at the 12-month follow-up in the gait training group and the control group was 16% and 38%, respectively. There was a hazard ratio of 0.38 between participants in the gait retraining group and those in the control group. This demonstrated gait-trained runners had a 62% lower risk of injury vs. controls, according to researchers. – by Monica Jaramillo

 

Disclosures: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.