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Arthroscopic anterior shoulder stabilization yielded high rate of return to sport

SAN DIEGO — Young athletes who underwent arthroscopic anterior shoulder stabilization surgery for shoulder instability had a low reoperation rate and a high rate of return to sport, according to results presented at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting.

Jacob G. Calcei , MD, and colleagues collected return-to-sport rates and rate of revision surgery among 63 athletes who underwent arthroscopic anterior shoulder stabilization surgery. Patients in the study were aged 22 years or younger.

“Time from initial injury to surgery was 11 months, and the time from the most recent injury to surgery was 6.5 months,” Calcei said in his presentation. “There was an average of just under 1.5 preoperative dislocations and nearly two-thirds had only one preoperative dislocation.”

Prior to surgery, Calcei noted all players were competitive athletes, with football being the most common sport played. Patients had an overall rate of revision surgery of 6%, according to Calcei, and had an average single assessment numerical evaluation score of 88. He added 82% of patients returned to sport at an average of 7.8 months. Of the patients who returned to sport, 76 patients returned to the same level or higher, Calcei said.

“There was a slight gender-specific difference in the rate of return to sports,” Calcei said. “Notably of the 12 patients that did not return to sports, seven did so for reasons other than their shoulder, whether it was graduation or for some other reason.” – by Casey Tingle

 

Reference:

Cordasco FA, et al. Abstract 163. Presented at: American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting; July 5-8, 2018; San Diego.

 

Disclosure: Calcei reports no relevant financial disclosures.

SAN DIEGO — Young athletes who underwent arthroscopic anterior shoulder stabilization surgery for shoulder instability had a low reoperation rate and a high rate of return to sport, according to results presented at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting.

Jacob G. Calcei , MD, and colleagues collected return-to-sport rates and rate of revision surgery among 63 athletes who underwent arthroscopic anterior shoulder stabilization surgery. Patients in the study were aged 22 years or younger.

“Time from initial injury to surgery was 11 months, and the time from the most recent injury to surgery was 6.5 months,” Calcei said in his presentation. “There was an average of just under 1.5 preoperative dislocations and nearly two-thirds had only one preoperative dislocation.”

Prior to surgery, Calcei noted all players were competitive athletes, with football being the most common sport played. Patients had an overall rate of revision surgery of 6%, according to Calcei, and had an average single assessment numerical evaluation score of 88. He added 82% of patients returned to sport at an average of 7.8 months. Of the patients who returned to sport, 76 patients returned to the same level or higher, Calcei said.

“There was a slight gender-specific difference in the rate of return to sports,” Calcei said. “Notably of the 12 patients that did not return to sports, seven did so for reasons other than their shoulder, whether it was graduation or for some other reason.” – by Casey Tingle

 

Reference:

Cordasco FA, et al. Abstract 163. Presented at: American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting; July 5-8, 2018; San Diego.

 

Disclosure: Calcei reports no relevant financial disclosures.

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