In the Journals

Moderate-, high-risk grouping using female athlete triad score linked with bone stress injuries

Recently published results showed athletes were more likely to sustain a bone stress injury if they were identified as moderate or high risk using the Female Athlete Triad Cumulative Risk Assessment Score.

Of 323 female athletes who completed an electronic pre-participation physical examination and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans, Michael Fredericson, MD, and colleagues assigned 239 athletes with known oligomenorrhea or amenorrhea to a low-, moderate- or high-risk category using the Female Athlete Triad Cumulative Risk Assessment Score. Researchers used chart review to identify athletes who sustained a subsequent bone stress injury during collegiate sports participation.

Michael Fredericson

Results showed 25.5% of the 239 athletes were classified into moderate-risk and 3.8% were grouped into high-risk categories. Gymnastics, lacrosse, cross-country, swimming/diving, sailing and volleyball had the highest proportion of athletes assigned to the moderate- and high-risk categories. According to results, one or more bone stress injuries were sustained in 10.5% of athletes assigned to risk categories, with cross-country runners contributing to most of the bone stress injuries.

After adjusting for age and participation in cross-country, researchers found moderate- and high-risk athletes were two- and four-times as likely to sustain a bone stress injury, respectively, compared with low-risk athletes. Among the six individual components of the triad risk assessment score, independent predictors for subsequent bone stress injuries included both the oligomenorrhea/amenorrhea score and the prior stress fracture/reaction score. – by Casey Tingle

Disclosure: This study was supported by the National Center for Research Resources and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, NIH.

Recently published results showed athletes were more likely to sustain a bone stress injury if they were identified as moderate or high risk using the Female Athlete Triad Cumulative Risk Assessment Score.

Of 323 female athletes who completed an electronic pre-participation physical examination and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans, Michael Fredericson, MD, and colleagues assigned 239 athletes with known oligomenorrhea or amenorrhea to a low-, moderate- or high-risk category using the Female Athlete Triad Cumulative Risk Assessment Score. Researchers used chart review to identify athletes who sustained a subsequent bone stress injury during collegiate sports participation.

Michael Fredericson

Results showed 25.5% of the 239 athletes were classified into moderate-risk and 3.8% were grouped into high-risk categories. Gymnastics, lacrosse, cross-country, swimming/diving, sailing and volleyball had the highest proportion of athletes assigned to the moderate- and high-risk categories. According to results, one or more bone stress injuries were sustained in 10.5% of athletes assigned to risk categories, with cross-country runners contributing to most of the bone stress injuries.

After adjusting for age and participation in cross-country, researchers found moderate- and high-risk athletes were two- and four-times as likely to sustain a bone stress injury, respectively, compared with low-risk athletes. Among the six individual components of the triad risk assessment score, independent predictors for subsequent bone stress injuries included both the oligomenorrhea/amenorrhea score and the prior stress fracture/reaction score. – by Casey Tingle

Disclosure: This study was supported by the National Center for Research Resources and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, NIH.