In the Journals

Knee-medial-to-foot position may be linked with worse kinesthesia, vibration sense after ACL injury

In men with ACL injury, worse kinesthesia may be associated with knee-medial-to-foot position during the drop jump, whereas in women, knee-medial-to-foot position may be associated with worse vibration sense at the foot and ankle, according to researchers.

The researchers assessed measures of sensory function by the threshold to detection of passive motion (TDPM) for knee kinesthesia and by the vibration perception threshold (VPT) for vibration sense in 51 patients (23 women) with ACL injury. The researchers also assessed movement quality by visual observation of the position of the knee relative to the foot during single-limb mini-squat, stair descending, forward lunge and the drop jump. Additionally, Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient was used to determine the relationship between the sensory measures and the medio-lateral knee position during the functional tasks.

During the drop jump, results showed men with a knee-medial-to-foot position (KMFP) experienced worse kinesthesia. The researchers also found women with a KMFP during stair descending experienced worse vibration sense at metatarsophalangeal joint 1 (MTP1) and medial malleolus (MM). Women with a KMFP during the forward lunge also experienced worse vibration sense at MM, according to the researchers.

Compared with women who had a knee-over-foot position (KOFP) during stair descending, women with KMFP had significantly worse vibration sense at MTP1 and MM. Results also showed significantly worse vibration sense at MM among women with a KMFP during the forward lunge vs. women with KOFP. However, no such differences were found in men. – by Casey Tingle

Disclosures: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

In men with ACL injury, worse kinesthesia may be associated with knee-medial-to-foot position during the drop jump, whereas in women, knee-medial-to-foot position may be associated with worse vibration sense at the foot and ankle, according to researchers.

The researchers assessed measures of sensory function by the threshold to detection of passive motion (TDPM) for knee kinesthesia and by the vibration perception threshold (VPT) for vibration sense in 51 patients (23 women) with ACL injury. The researchers also assessed movement quality by visual observation of the position of the knee relative to the foot during single-limb mini-squat, stair descending, forward lunge and the drop jump. Additionally, Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient was used to determine the relationship between the sensory measures and the medio-lateral knee position during the functional tasks.

During the drop jump, results showed men with a knee-medial-to-foot position (KMFP) experienced worse kinesthesia. The researchers also found women with a KMFP during stair descending experienced worse vibration sense at metatarsophalangeal joint 1 (MTP1) and medial malleolus (MM). Women with a KMFP during the forward lunge also experienced worse vibration sense at MM, according to the researchers.

Compared with women who had a knee-over-foot position (KOFP) during stair descending, women with KMFP had significantly worse vibration sense at MTP1 and MM. Results also showed significantly worse vibration sense at MM among women with a KMFP during the forward lunge vs. women with KOFP. However, no such differences were found in men. – by Casey Tingle

Disclosures: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.