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Patients with government insurance had longer wait times for ACL reconstruction

SAN DIEGO — Pediatric patients with an ACL injury who had commercial health insurance underwent reconstruction surgery sooner than patients with government health insurance, according to results presented at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting.

Curtis Vandenberg headshot
Curtis Vandenberg

Curtis Vandenberg, MD, and colleagues measured socioeconomic status by health insurance type and household income among 127 pediatric patients with ACL injury to assess the impact of socioeconomic status on the time to surgical intervention after ACL injury and outcomes following primary ACL reconstruction.

“Regarding insurance type, we had 69 [patients] with commercial insurance and 58 with government-assisted insurance,” Vandenberg said in his presentation here.

Results also showed an average household median income of $87,767 among patients with commercial insurance vs. $51,366 among patients with government insurance.

Vandenberg noted time from injury to first appointment, injury to MRI, injury to surgery, first appointment to surgery and injury to return to play were twice as long among the government insurance group vs. the commercial insurance group.

“We also tried to correlate surgical factors looking at specifically meniscal and chondral injury,” Vandenberg said. “In the commercially insured patient, there was approximately [a] 65% rate of associated meniscal pathology at the time of surgery vs. 81% in the government-insured patients.”

During the postoperative period, patients in the government-assisted insurance group experienced decreased range of motion, according to Vandenberg. However, he added there was no statistically significant difference with graft failure, reoperation and infection between groups.

“In looking at injury to return to play, it was 11 vs. 13 months longer in the government-insured group,” Vandenberg said. – by Casey Tingle

 

Reference:

Patel AR, et al. Abstract 149. Presented at: American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting; July 5-9, 2018; San Diego.

 

Disclosure: Vandenberg reports no relevant financial disclosures.

SAN DIEGO — Pediatric patients with an ACL injury who had commercial health insurance underwent reconstruction surgery sooner than patients with government health insurance, according to results presented at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting.

Curtis Vandenberg headshot
Curtis Vandenberg

Curtis Vandenberg, MD, and colleagues measured socioeconomic status by health insurance type and household income among 127 pediatric patients with ACL injury to assess the impact of socioeconomic status on the time to surgical intervention after ACL injury and outcomes following primary ACL reconstruction.

“Regarding insurance type, we had 69 [patients] with commercial insurance and 58 with government-assisted insurance,” Vandenberg said in his presentation here.

Results also showed an average household median income of $87,767 among patients with commercial insurance vs. $51,366 among patients with government insurance.

Vandenberg noted time from injury to first appointment, injury to MRI, injury to surgery, first appointment to surgery and injury to return to play were twice as long among the government insurance group vs. the commercial insurance group.

“We also tried to correlate surgical factors looking at specifically meniscal and chondral injury,” Vandenberg said. “In the commercially insured patient, there was approximately [a] 65% rate of associated meniscal pathology at the time of surgery vs. 81% in the government-insured patients.”

During the postoperative period, patients in the government-assisted insurance group experienced decreased range of motion, according to Vandenberg. However, he added there was no statistically significant difference with graft failure, reoperation and infection between groups.

“In looking at injury to return to play, it was 11 vs. 13 months longer in the government-insured group,” Vandenberg said. – by Casey Tingle

 

Reference:

Patel AR, et al. Abstract 149. Presented at: American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting; July 5-9, 2018; San Diego.

 

Disclosure: Vandenberg reports no relevant financial disclosures.

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