In the Journals

Promising results found for older recreational athletes following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair

Among recreational athletes aged 70 years and older, researchers of this study found arthroscopic rotator cuff repair effectively reduced pain, improved function and returned patients to sport.

Using a surgical registry, researchers identified 44 self-described recreational athletes aged 70 years and older who underwent primary or revision arthroscopic rotator cuff repair of full-thickness supraspinatus tears. All patients had a Goutallier classification of 0, 1 or 2.

Peter J. Millett

 

Researchers collected demographic and surgical data and clinical outcomes scores, including the ASES, Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation, QuickDASH and SF-12 Physical Component Summary scores, as well as acromiohumeral distance and Goutallier classifications. At final follow-up, researchers collected patient satisfaction and reasons for activity modification.

Among the 33 men and 11 women, researchers found a mean preoperative acromiohumeral distance of 9.2 mm. At a mean follow-up of 3.6 years, investigators found no cases of rotator cuff repair revision and one patient had surgery for stiffness. The study also showed significant improvements for all postoperative outcome measures compared with preoperative baseline scores. Researchers also found a median patient satisfaction of 10 (on a one to 10 scale), with significantly less satisfied results among patients who modified their recreational activities due to postoperative weakness. Overall, researchers noted 77% of respondents were able to return to sport at a similar level of intensity. – by Casey Tingle

Disclosure: Bhatia reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

Among recreational athletes aged 70 years and older, researchers of this study found arthroscopic rotator cuff repair effectively reduced pain, improved function and returned patients to sport.

Using a surgical registry, researchers identified 44 self-described recreational athletes aged 70 years and older who underwent primary or revision arthroscopic rotator cuff repair of full-thickness supraspinatus tears. All patients had a Goutallier classification of 0, 1 or 2.

Peter J. Millett

 

Researchers collected demographic and surgical data and clinical outcomes scores, including the ASES, Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation, QuickDASH and SF-12 Physical Component Summary scores, as well as acromiohumeral distance and Goutallier classifications. At final follow-up, researchers collected patient satisfaction and reasons for activity modification.

Among the 33 men and 11 women, researchers found a mean preoperative acromiohumeral distance of 9.2 mm. At a mean follow-up of 3.6 years, investigators found no cases of rotator cuff repair revision and one patient had surgery for stiffness. The study also showed significant improvements for all postoperative outcome measures compared with preoperative baseline scores. Researchers also found a median patient satisfaction of 10 (on a one to 10 scale), with significantly less satisfied results among patients who modified their recreational activities due to postoperative weakness. Overall, researchers noted 77% of respondents were able to return to sport at a similar level of intensity. – by Casey Tingle

Disclosure: Bhatia reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.