Meeting News

Platelet-rich plasma has isolated protective effect on meniscus repair failure risk

David C. Flanigan

BOSTON — Intraoperative platelet-rich plasma was shown to have a protective effect on isolated meniscus repair failure risk, and there is highly significant interaction between PRP and ACL status, according to data presented here at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting.

“The effect of meniscus repair risk varied based on the ACL reconstruction,” David C. Flanigan, MD, from The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio, said. “PRP reduced isolated meniscus repair failure risk, but it had no effect on meniscus repairs with ACL reconstruction.”

The retrospective study enrolled 550 patients who were undergoing meniscal repair during a period of 10 years. A total of 203 patients had meniscus repair surgery with PRP, of which 148 patients received PRP prepared with GPS III system and 55 patients received PRP prepared with Angel system, which was based on the year of surgery; and 347 patients did not receive PRP. PRP was injected underneath the meniscal repair after all joint fluid was removed. Additionally, 399 of these patients had concurrent ACL reconstruction and 151 patients did not have concurrent ACL reconstruction. Mean age was 28.8 years. Researchers assessed the effect PRP had on meniscus repair failure within 3 years with multivariate Cox proportional hazards modeling. Follow-up at 3 years was 83%.

Overall, 17% of patients who did not receive PRP and 14.7% of patients who had PRP had meniscus repair failures within 3 years. Flanigan said there was no difference in protective effect for the specific preparation system used.

PRP in intact ACLs had a strong protective effect; however, PRP in concomitant ACL reconstruction had no benefit. Increased age had a mild protective effect on meniscus repair and was protective against meniscus failure regardless of ACL or PRP status. by Kristine Houck, MA, ELS

 

Reference:

Everhart JS, et al. Abstract 1. Presented at: American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting; July 11-14, 2019; Boston.

 

Disclosure: Flanigan reports the study was an unfunded, investigator-initiated study and he is a consultant for ConMed Linvatec, DePuy, Moximed, Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation, Smith & Nephew, Vericel and Zimmer Biomet; and receives research support from Aesculap/B. Braun, Anika Therapeutics, Arthrex, Cartiheal, Ceterix, Histogenics, Moximed, Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation, Smith & Nephew, Stryker, Vericel and Zimmer Biomet.

David C. Flanigan

BOSTON — Intraoperative platelet-rich plasma was shown to have a protective effect on isolated meniscus repair failure risk, and there is highly significant interaction between PRP and ACL status, according to data presented here at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting.

“The effect of meniscus repair risk varied based on the ACL reconstruction,” David C. Flanigan, MD, from The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio, said. “PRP reduced isolated meniscus repair failure risk, but it had no effect on meniscus repairs with ACL reconstruction.”

The retrospective study enrolled 550 patients who were undergoing meniscal repair during a period of 10 years. A total of 203 patients had meniscus repair surgery with PRP, of which 148 patients received PRP prepared with GPS III system and 55 patients received PRP prepared with Angel system, which was based on the year of surgery; and 347 patients did not receive PRP. PRP was injected underneath the meniscal repair after all joint fluid was removed. Additionally, 399 of these patients had concurrent ACL reconstruction and 151 patients did not have concurrent ACL reconstruction. Mean age was 28.8 years. Researchers assessed the effect PRP had on meniscus repair failure within 3 years with multivariate Cox proportional hazards modeling. Follow-up at 3 years was 83%.

Overall, 17% of patients who did not receive PRP and 14.7% of patients who had PRP had meniscus repair failures within 3 years. Flanigan said there was no difference in protective effect for the specific preparation system used.

PRP in intact ACLs had a strong protective effect; however, PRP in concomitant ACL reconstruction had no benefit. Increased age had a mild protective effect on meniscus repair and was protective against meniscus failure regardless of ACL or PRP status. by Kristine Houck, MA, ELS

 

Reference:

Everhart JS, et al. Abstract 1. Presented at: American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting; July 11-14, 2019; Boston.

 

Disclosure: Flanigan reports the study was an unfunded, investigator-initiated study and he is a consultant for ConMed Linvatec, DePuy, Moximed, Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation, Smith & Nephew, Vericel and Zimmer Biomet; and receives research support from Aesculap/B. Braun, Anika Therapeutics, Arthrex, Cartiheal, Ceterix, Histogenics, Moximed, Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation, Smith & Nephew, Stryker, Vericel and Zimmer Biomet.

    See more from American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting