In the Journals

Less knee joint loading correlated with early knee OA following ACL reconstruction

Patients with early radiographic evidence of knee osteoarthritis 5 years after ACL reconstruction had lower knee adduction moments and medial compartment joint contact forces when walking compared to patients with no such evidence of osteoarthritis, according to study results.

Researchers evaluated 22 patients with a complete, unilateral ACL injury and performed a gait analysis before and after preoperative rehabilitation. Gait analysis also was performed after ACL reconstruction  (ACLR) at 6 months, 1 year and 2 years.

Investigators created an electromyographically driven musculoskeletal model, and used surface elctromyographic and knee biochemical data to estimate knee joint contact forces. Five years after ACLR, patients underwent radiographic testing. Patients with radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis (OA) and those without OA were compared with regard to differences in knee joint kinetics and contact forces.

Results showed patients with OA compared to patients without the condition walked with a lower peak knee adduction moment, and inter-limb differences between the groups were significant. After preoperative rehabilitation, patients with OA had improvement in asymmetric peak frontal plane moments; however 6 months after ACLR, the OA and control groups showed significant differences for this measure.

At baseline, the OA group compared with the control group had lower knee adduction moment impulse in the involved limb. At 6 months and 1 year, there were large differences between the groups with regard to peak medial compartment contact forces in the involved limb, according to researchers. by Monica Jaramillo

Disclosures: Wellstandt reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

Patients with early radiographic evidence of knee osteoarthritis 5 years after ACL reconstruction had lower knee adduction moments and medial compartment joint contact forces when walking compared to patients with no such evidence of osteoarthritis, according to study results.

Researchers evaluated 22 patients with a complete, unilateral ACL injury and performed a gait analysis before and after preoperative rehabilitation. Gait analysis also was performed after ACL reconstruction  (ACLR) at 6 months, 1 year and 2 years.

Investigators created an electromyographically driven musculoskeletal model, and used surface elctromyographic and knee biochemical data to estimate knee joint contact forces. Five years after ACLR, patients underwent radiographic testing. Patients with radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis (OA) and those without OA were compared with regard to differences in knee joint kinetics and contact forces.

Results showed patients with OA compared to patients without the condition walked with a lower peak knee adduction moment, and inter-limb differences between the groups were significant. After preoperative rehabilitation, patients with OA had improvement in asymmetric peak frontal plane moments; however 6 months after ACLR, the OA and control groups showed significant differences for this measure.

At baseline, the OA group compared with the control group had lower knee adduction moment impulse in the involved limb. At 6 months and 1 year, there were large differences between the groups with regard to peak medial compartment contact forces in the involved limb, according to researchers. by Monica Jaramillo

Disclosures: Wellstandt reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.