Meeting News

Higher return-to-play rates seen with knotless vs traditional anchors for SLAP type II repair

SAN DIEGO — Research that compared knotless anchors with traditional anchors used in superior labrum anterior and posterior type IIb repair demonstrated that patients who had knotless anchors had a lower rate of revision surgeries, had higher return-to-play rates and better American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons and Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic scores. However, outcomes did not reach statistical significance.

James P. Bradley, MD, presented results at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting. Bradley and colleagues evaluated 74 patients who underwent arthroscopic in SLAP type IIb repair, of which 42 patients underwent repair with traditional knot-type anchors and 32 patients with knotless anchors. The minimum follow-up was 2 years, with an average follow-up of 6.5 years.

“The largest group of athletes were 20% baseball players. We had 73% of the overall group was some form of overhead athlete,” Bradley said during his presentation. “Of the overall group, 40% was some sort of thrower in baseball or other sports.”

Investigators compared demographics, surgical data, return to play, Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic (KJOC), ASES, stability, range of motion, strength and pain scores among the two anchor types.

Investigators found a higher return-to-play rate with knotless anchors compared with traditional anchors, with rates of 93.5% vs. 90.2%. However, the difference was not significantly different. Knotless vs. traditional anchors had a lower risk of revision surgery; however, the difference was not significant. The two anchor types were not different with regard to KJOC, ASES, stability, strength and pain scores. The only factor that was linked with a decreased return to play was pain.

Significantly lower KJOC and ASES scores were seen in younger patients; although there was no difference in return to play. Outcome measures and return to play were not different with regard to gender, age, overhead athletes, number of anchors and sport type. – by Monica Jaramillo

 

Reference:

Arner JW, et al. Paper 152. Presented at: American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting; July 5-8, 2018; San Diego.

Disclosure: Bradley reports he is a board or committee member for the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine and receives royalties from Arthrex Inc.

 

SAN DIEGO — Research that compared knotless anchors with traditional anchors used in superior labrum anterior and posterior type IIb repair demonstrated that patients who had knotless anchors had a lower rate of revision surgeries, had higher return-to-play rates and better American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons and Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic scores. However, outcomes did not reach statistical significance.

James P. Bradley, MD, presented results at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting. Bradley and colleagues evaluated 74 patients who underwent arthroscopic in SLAP type IIb repair, of which 42 patients underwent repair with traditional knot-type anchors and 32 patients with knotless anchors. The minimum follow-up was 2 years, with an average follow-up of 6.5 years.

“The largest group of athletes were 20% baseball players. We had 73% of the overall group was some form of overhead athlete,” Bradley said during his presentation. “Of the overall group, 40% was some sort of thrower in baseball or other sports.”

Investigators compared demographics, surgical data, return to play, Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic (KJOC), ASES, stability, range of motion, strength and pain scores among the two anchor types.

Investigators found a higher return-to-play rate with knotless anchors compared with traditional anchors, with rates of 93.5% vs. 90.2%. However, the difference was not significantly different. Knotless vs. traditional anchors had a lower risk of revision surgery; however, the difference was not significant. The two anchor types were not different with regard to KJOC, ASES, stability, strength and pain scores. The only factor that was linked with a decreased return to play was pain.

Significantly lower KJOC and ASES scores were seen in younger patients; although there was no difference in return to play. Outcome measures and return to play were not different with regard to gender, age, overhead athletes, number of anchors and sport type. – by Monica Jaramillo

 

Reference:

Arner JW, et al. Paper 152. Presented at: American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting; July 5-8, 2018; San Diego.

Disclosure: Bradley reports he is a board or committee member for the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine and receives royalties from Arthrex Inc.