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More cartilage, meniscus injury with delayed reconstruction of multiligament knee injuries

Alan G. Shamrock

BOSTON — A 6-week or more delay in the surgical reconstruction of multiligament knee injuries is associated with increased cartilage and meniscus injury, according to results of a study presented at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting.

“This may be the result of the severity of the initial injury, which may warrant surgical delay in more severe cases, or persistent knee instability placing the menisci and chondral surface at risk for injury,” Alan G. Shamrock, MD, from the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics in Iowa City, Iowa, said, here.

In the retrospective study, researchers studied 207 patients who were surgically treated for multiligament knee injuries involving at least two ligaments (ACL, PCL or medial collateral ligaments) during a 15-year period. More than 75% of patients were men. Patients were grouped by ligament injury pattern. Overall, there were 104 meniscal injuries and 70 chondral injuries There were 112 patients in the acute group, which was surgery within 6 weeks of injury, and 95 patients in the delayed group who had surgery more than 6 weeks from injury. Researchers found 47 patients had ACL/MCL injuries, 47 patients had ACL/PCL injuries and 35 patients had ACL/PCL/MCL injuries.

Meniscectomy was performed most frequently at 50%, with 30.8% of patients having meniscus repair. Patients who had delayed surgery showed more meniscus pathology compared to patients in the acute group (57.1% vs 42.1%, respectively). Patients in the delayed group were also more likely to undergo meniscectomy.

Eleven of the 70 cartilage injuries required surgical debridement. Researchers found chondral pathology was more frequently seen in patients in the delayed surgery group.  by Kristine Houck, MA, ELS

 

Reference:

Shamrock AG, et al. Abstract 55 Presented at: American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting; July 11-14, 2019; Boston.

Disclosure: Shamrock reports no relevant financial disclosures.

 

Alan G. Shamrock

BOSTON — A 6-week or more delay in the surgical reconstruction of multiligament knee injuries is associated with increased cartilage and meniscus injury, according to results of a study presented at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting.

“This may be the result of the severity of the initial injury, which may warrant surgical delay in more severe cases, or persistent knee instability placing the menisci and chondral surface at risk for injury,” Alan G. Shamrock, MD, from the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics in Iowa City, Iowa, said, here.

In the retrospective study, researchers studied 207 patients who were surgically treated for multiligament knee injuries involving at least two ligaments (ACL, PCL or medial collateral ligaments) during a 15-year period. More than 75% of patients were men. Patients were grouped by ligament injury pattern. Overall, there were 104 meniscal injuries and 70 chondral injuries There were 112 patients in the acute group, which was surgery within 6 weeks of injury, and 95 patients in the delayed group who had surgery more than 6 weeks from injury. Researchers found 47 patients had ACL/MCL injuries, 47 patients had ACL/PCL injuries and 35 patients had ACL/PCL/MCL injuries.

Meniscectomy was performed most frequently at 50%, with 30.8% of patients having meniscus repair. Patients who had delayed surgery showed more meniscus pathology compared to patients in the acute group (57.1% vs 42.1%, respectively). Patients in the delayed group were also more likely to undergo meniscectomy.

Eleven of the 70 cartilage injuries required surgical debridement. Researchers found chondral pathology was more frequently seen in patients in the delayed surgery group.  by Kristine Houck, MA, ELS

 

Reference:

Shamrock AG, et al. Abstract 55 Presented at: American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting; July 11-14, 2019; Boston.

Disclosure: Shamrock reports no relevant financial disclosures.

 

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