In the Journals

Factors affected variability in PF instability injuries among high school athletes

Understanding that patterns of patellofemoral instability injuries among high school athletes may vary by sport, sex and type of exposure, which investigators in this study found, may help with the formulation of new injury prevention strategies and to decrease the risk of further patellofemoral instability injuries.

From the National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance System, investigators obtained data on patellofemoral instability injuries sustained for 22 sports from 2007 to 2008 through 2012 to 2013. They collected data regarding athlete demographics, injury mechanism and details, practice vs. competition, return to play (RTP) and any required surgery.

David C. Flanigan

Overall, 421 patellar instability injuries were reported during that period and results showed the highest injury rates were sustained in girls gymnastics, boys football and boys wrestling. Although girls had a significantly lower overall injury rate compared to boys, among sex-comparable sports their actual injury rate was higher.

Researchers found higher injury rates during competition than practice. According to the study results, the most commonly reported injury mechanism was a no-contact injury and player-to-player contact was the second mostly commonly reported injury mechanism. Researchers noted the overall contact mechanism represented 59.3% of injuries when all contact subcategories were combined. Within 3 weeks of injury, about 60% of athletes studied were able to RTP. Less common outcomes after injury included RTP that exceeded 3 weeks and loss of the remainder of the season, according to the study results. – by Casey Tingle

Disclosure: Mitchell reports no relevant financial disclosures.

Understanding that patterns of patellofemoral instability injuries among high school athletes may vary by sport, sex and type of exposure, which investigators in this study found, may help with the formulation of new injury prevention strategies and to decrease the risk of further patellofemoral instability injuries.

From the National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance System, investigators obtained data on patellofemoral instability injuries sustained for 22 sports from 2007 to 2008 through 2012 to 2013. They collected data regarding athlete demographics, injury mechanism and details, practice vs. competition, return to play (RTP) and any required surgery.

David C. Flanigan

Overall, 421 patellar instability injuries were reported during that period and results showed the highest injury rates were sustained in girls gymnastics, boys football and boys wrestling. Although girls had a significantly lower overall injury rate compared to boys, among sex-comparable sports their actual injury rate was higher.

Researchers found higher injury rates during competition than practice. According to the study results, the most commonly reported injury mechanism was a no-contact injury and player-to-player contact was the second mostly commonly reported injury mechanism. Researchers noted the overall contact mechanism represented 59.3% of injuries when all contact subcategories were combined. Within 3 weeks of injury, about 60% of athletes studied were able to RTP. Less common outcomes after injury included RTP that exceeded 3 weeks and loss of the remainder of the season, according to the study results. – by Casey Tingle

Disclosure: Mitchell reports no relevant financial disclosures.