In the Journals

Study explores spinal column shortening for tethered cord syndrome in pediatric patients

For children and young adults with tethered cord syndrome, investigators of this study found spinal column shortening was a safe and efficient alternative treatment to untethering the spinal cord.

Researchers retrospectively reviewed seven children and young adults who underwent spinal column shortening for either primary or secondary tethered cord syndrome. Average follow-up was 31 months. Preoperatively and at 2 weeks, 3 months and 6 months postoperatively, and every year thereafter, investigators assessed gait, bowel and bladder function. They also assessed patient-reported outcomes with the Scoliosis Research Society Outcomes Questionnaire (SRS-22) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). A fusion assessment was performed 12 months postoperatively based on CT findings.

Outcomes from CT findings showed that by the most recent follow-up there was solid fusion in all patients and no instrumentation failure was seen. During the follow-up period, five patients reported improvements in preoperative symptoms.

According to researchers, the mean difference between the preoperative and postoperative scores was 0.26 for the SRS-22 score and was -13% for the ODI score. The minimum clinically importance difference for the SRS-22 was 0.4% and was -12.8% for the ODI. – by Monica Jaramillo

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.




 

For children and young adults with tethered cord syndrome, investigators of this study found spinal column shortening was a safe and efficient alternative treatment to untethering the spinal cord.

Researchers retrospectively reviewed seven children and young adults who underwent spinal column shortening for either primary or secondary tethered cord syndrome. Average follow-up was 31 months. Preoperatively and at 2 weeks, 3 months and 6 months postoperatively, and every year thereafter, investigators assessed gait, bowel and bladder function. They also assessed patient-reported outcomes with the Scoliosis Research Society Outcomes Questionnaire (SRS-22) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). A fusion assessment was performed 12 months postoperatively based on CT findings.

Outcomes from CT findings showed that by the most recent follow-up there was solid fusion in all patients and no instrumentation failure was seen. During the follow-up period, five patients reported improvements in preoperative symptoms.

According to researchers, the mean difference between the preoperative and postoperative scores was 0.26 for the SRS-22 score and was -13% for the ODI score. The minimum clinically importance difference for the SRS-22 was 0.4% and was -12.8% for the ODI. – by Monica Jaramillo

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.