In the Journals

Functional status significantly impacts satisfaction with outcomes 12 months after spine surgery

Investigators found a significant correlation between absolute 12-month Oswestry Disability Index score and patient satisfaction after surgery for degenerative lumbar disease.

“From the quality outcomes measurement standpoint, this study suggests no single outcome measure can be used as a sole yardstick to measure quality of care after spine surgery. Satisfaction may be utilized in conjunction with baseline and 12-month [Oswestry Disability Index] ODI scores to provide an assessment of the quality of spine surgery in a patient-centric fashion,” Silky Chotai, MD, told Healio.com/Orthopedics.

Silky Chotai

She added, “From a real-world clinic standpoint, this study highlights the importance of determining and discussing realistic expectations during the preoperative discussion. This can only be achieved when the surgeon understands the patient’s prioritized list of expectations and can provide factual probabilities of achieving better or worse outcomes for these individualized expectations. Such improved expectations discussions will allow patients to understand a reasonabl,e individualized outcome following surgery and may enhance satisfaction.”

Chotai and colleagues identified 5,443 patients who underwent elective surgery for degenerative lumbar disease. Patients were assessed at baseline, and 12-month patient-reported outcomes were assessed via a phone interview. Primary outcome measures included the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and the North American Spine Society questionnaire. The ODI was used to determine how functional status affected satisfaction.

At 12 months, 64% of the patients were satisfied at a level where the surgery had met their expectations. After baseline and surgery-specific variables were adjusted, investigators noted the 12-month ODI score had the greatest impact on the achievement of outcome satisfaction vs. baseline ODI scores.

“The level of satisfaction decreases with increasing 12-month ODI score,” the researchers wrote. According to researchers, when a patient starts with a higher baseline ODI score, a greater change in their ODI is needed to achieve better satisfaction. – by Monica Jaramillo

Disclosures: Chotai reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

Investigators found a significant correlation between absolute 12-month Oswestry Disability Index score and patient satisfaction after surgery for degenerative lumbar disease.

“From the quality outcomes measurement standpoint, this study suggests no single outcome measure can be used as a sole yardstick to measure quality of care after spine surgery. Satisfaction may be utilized in conjunction with baseline and 12-month [Oswestry Disability Index] ODI scores to provide an assessment of the quality of spine surgery in a patient-centric fashion,” Silky Chotai, MD, told Healio.com/Orthopedics.

Silky Chotai

She added, “From a real-world clinic standpoint, this study highlights the importance of determining and discussing realistic expectations during the preoperative discussion. This can only be achieved when the surgeon understands the patient’s prioritized list of expectations and can provide factual probabilities of achieving better or worse outcomes for these individualized expectations. Such improved expectations discussions will allow patients to understand a reasonabl,e individualized outcome following surgery and may enhance satisfaction.”

Chotai and colleagues identified 5,443 patients who underwent elective surgery for degenerative lumbar disease. Patients were assessed at baseline, and 12-month patient-reported outcomes were assessed via a phone interview. Primary outcome measures included the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and the North American Spine Society questionnaire. The ODI was used to determine how functional status affected satisfaction.

At 12 months, 64% of the patients were satisfied at a level where the surgery had met their expectations. After baseline and surgery-specific variables were adjusted, investigators noted the 12-month ODI score had the greatest impact on the achievement of outcome satisfaction vs. baseline ODI scores.

“The level of satisfaction decreases with increasing 12-month ODI score,” the researchers wrote. According to researchers, when a patient starts with a higher baseline ODI score, a greater change in their ODI is needed to achieve better satisfaction. – by Monica Jaramillo

Disclosures: Chotai reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.