In the Journals

App-based back pain treatment linked with better outcomes vs physiotherapy plus online education

A multidisciplinary back pain app yielded better outcomes than a combination of physiotherapy and online education for patients with low back pain, according to recently published results.

In a randomized controlled trial, researchers identified 101 patients with non-specific low back pain. They assigned 53 patients to use the Kaia app, a multidisciplinary mHealth back pain app for 3 months, while 48 patients received six physiotherapy sessions for 6 weeks and online education. At the 12-week follow-up, pain intensity was evaluated based on an 11-point numeric rating scale. Forty-two patients in the app group and 44 patients in the control group were analyzed per protocol for the analysis. At baseline, treatment groups were not significantly different, according to results from the per-protocol analysis.

No current back pain was reported in three patients who used the app and in four patients in the control group at 6-week follow-up. Lower pain intensity was reported in patients who used the app compared with patients in the control group at 12-week follow-up. At the same follow-up, 14 patients who used the app reported no current back pain vs. seven patients in the control group.
Based on measurement from the Hannover Functional Ability Questionnaire and VR-12, no main effects were seen in functional ability and well-being. Results from the graded chronic pain scale showed between-group differences were not substantially different; however, a greater decrease in impairment was seen in patients who used the app. – by Monica Jaramillo

Disclosures: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

A multidisciplinary back pain app yielded better outcomes than a combination of physiotherapy and online education for patients with low back pain, according to recently published results.

In a randomized controlled trial, researchers identified 101 patients with non-specific low back pain. They assigned 53 patients to use the Kaia app, a multidisciplinary mHealth back pain app for 3 months, while 48 patients received six physiotherapy sessions for 6 weeks and online education. At the 12-week follow-up, pain intensity was evaluated based on an 11-point numeric rating scale. Forty-two patients in the app group and 44 patients in the control group were analyzed per protocol for the analysis. At baseline, treatment groups were not significantly different, according to results from the per-protocol analysis.

No current back pain was reported in three patients who used the app and in four patients in the control group at 6-week follow-up. Lower pain intensity was reported in patients who used the app compared with patients in the control group at 12-week follow-up. At the same follow-up, 14 patients who used the app reported no current back pain vs. seven patients in the control group.
Based on measurement from the Hannover Functional Ability Questionnaire and VR-12, no main effects were seen in functional ability and well-being. Results from the graded chronic pain scale showed between-group differences were not substantially different; however, a greater decrease in impairment was seen in patients who used the app. – by Monica Jaramillo

Disclosures: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.