In the Journals

Spinal chondrosarcoma resection may lead to complications, reoperations

According to recently published results, spinal chondrosarcoma impacts quality of life and function. In addition, researchers found that after resection, there was a high risk of complications and reoperations.

Researchers identified 33 patients who underwent spinal conventional chondrosarcoma resection. The minimum follow-up was 6 months. In 14 of 20 patients, the primary outcomes included EuroQol-5D, patient-reported outcomes measurement information system (PROMIS)-physical function, PROMIS-pain intensity, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Neck Disability Index (NDI). In all patients, investigators reported complications, readmission, reoperations, oncological outcomes and neurological status.

Results showed that compared with U.S. general population values, 14 patients after spine chondrosarcoma resection said they had worse physical function, worse quality of life and similar pain intensity. The median NDI/ODI was 23, which according to researchers demonstrated mild to moderate disability. Worse patient-reported outcomes were seen in patients who underwent reoperation compared with those who did not have a reoperation. Complications were seen in 18 patients at 90 days. Fourteen patients had unplanned readmission and 13 patients underwent reoperation. Increased readmission, reoperation and recurrence rates correlated with intralesional resection. – by Monica Jaramillo

 

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

 

According to recently published results, spinal chondrosarcoma impacts quality of life and function. In addition, researchers found that after resection, there was a high risk of complications and reoperations.

Researchers identified 33 patients who underwent spinal conventional chondrosarcoma resection. The minimum follow-up was 6 months. In 14 of 20 patients, the primary outcomes included EuroQol-5D, patient-reported outcomes measurement information system (PROMIS)-physical function, PROMIS-pain intensity, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Neck Disability Index (NDI). In all patients, investigators reported complications, readmission, reoperations, oncological outcomes and neurological status.

Results showed that compared with U.S. general population values, 14 patients after spine chondrosarcoma resection said they had worse physical function, worse quality of life and similar pain intensity. The median NDI/ODI was 23, which according to researchers demonstrated mild to moderate disability. Worse patient-reported outcomes were seen in patients who underwent reoperation compared with those who did not have a reoperation. Complications were seen in 18 patients at 90 days. Fourteen patients had unplanned readmission and 13 patients underwent reoperation. Increased readmission, reoperation and recurrence rates correlated with intralesional resection. – by Monica Jaramillo

 

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.