Safe Orthopaedics announces new technologies for bone metastases-related and osteoporotic spinal injuries

Safe Orthopaedics announced the release of a new transverse connector and cement for use in the treatment of spinal injuries from osteoporosis and metastatic bone.

According to a company press release, the new connector is designed to rigidify the stabilization of posterior spinal osteosynthesis. The cement, which is injected through Safe Orthopaedics’ Cypress screw, is made to enhance the anchoring strength of the screws, which reportedly reduces the risk of postoperative instability and repeat surgery. The use of a cannula inside the screwdriver’s handle to inject the cement reportedly makes the procedure easier and reduces operating time. In addition, because the cement is injected directly into the vertebra using Safe Orthopaedics’ single-use screwdriver, according to the release, the risk of cement leakage is eliminated.

“With these additions to our range, which meet our availability and modularity requirements, we are now able to offer more options to surgeons to treat bone injuries associated with osteoporosis and metastases,” Pierre Dumouchel, chief executive officer of Safe Orthopaedics, said in the release. “Our Oak screw, dedicated to the treatment of spinal fractures, will also be available in a cementable version this year, to offer simultaneous correction and fixation of osteoporotic vertebral fractures using a percutaneous approach.”

Reference:

www.safeortho.com

Safe Orthopaedics announced the release of a new transverse connector and cement for use in the treatment of spinal injuries from osteoporosis and metastatic bone.

According to a company press release, the new connector is designed to rigidify the stabilization of posterior spinal osteosynthesis. The cement, which is injected through Safe Orthopaedics’ Cypress screw, is made to enhance the anchoring strength of the screws, which reportedly reduces the risk of postoperative instability and repeat surgery. The use of a cannula inside the screwdriver’s handle to inject the cement reportedly makes the procedure easier and reduces operating time. In addition, because the cement is injected directly into the vertebra using Safe Orthopaedics’ single-use screwdriver, according to the release, the risk of cement leakage is eliminated.

“With these additions to our range, which meet our availability and modularity requirements, we are now able to offer more options to surgeons to treat bone injuries associated with osteoporosis and metastases,” Pierre Dumouchel, chief executive officer of Safe Orthopaedics, said in the release. “Our Oak screw, dedicated to the treatment of spinal fractures, will also be available in a cementable version this year, to offer simultaneous correction and fixation of osteoporotic vertebral fractures using a percutaneous approach.”

Reference:

www.safeortho.com