In the Journals

Central sensitization inventory may be useful as treatment outcome measure for chronic spinal pain disorder

The Central Sensitization Inventory may be useful as a screen and treatment outcome measure for patients who attend an interdisciplinary function restoration program for chronic spinal pain disorder, according to a recently published study.

Researchers identified 763 patients with chronic spinal pain disorder who had completed the central sensitization inventory (CSI) at admission and discharge from an interdisciplinary function restoration program. Mood disorders and abuse history were evaluated during clinical interviews. Investigates used self-reported measures to assess comorbid psychosocial symptoms, such as pain intensity, pain-related anxiety, depressive symptoms, somatization symptoms, perceived disability and sleep disturbance.

Results showed a strong association between CSI severity groups, major depressive disorder and previous abuse history. These factors were risk factors for central sensitization-related symptoms and diagnoses.

Investigators noted a strong correlation between the CSI scores and patient-reported central sensitivity syndrome (CSS) diagnoses on CSI part B. The CSI severity groups were significantly associated with central sensitization-related patient-reported symptoms. At the treatment discharge, CSI scores and psychosocial measures decreased.

According to researchers, 11% of patients in the subclinical group and 56% of patients in the extreme group reported a comorbid CSS diagnosis. – by Monica Jaramillo

Disclosure s : The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

The Central Sensitization Inventory may be useful as a screen and treatment outcome measure for patients who attend an interdisciplinary function restoration program for chronic spinal pain disorder, according to a recently published study.

Researchers identified 763 patients with chronic spinal pain disorder who had completed the central sensitization inventory (CSI) at admission and discharge from an interdisciplinary function restoration program. Mood disorders and abuse history were evaluated during clinical interviews. Investigates used self-reported measures to assess comorbid psychosocial symptoms, such as pain intensity, pain-related anxiety, depressive symptoms, somatization symptoms, perceived disability and sleep disturbance.

Results showed a strong association between CSI severity groups, major depressive disorder and previous abuse history. These factors were risk factors for central sensitization-related symptoms and diagnoses.

Investigators noted a strong correlation between the CSI scores and patient-reported central sensitivity syndrome (CSS) diagnoses on CSI part B. The CSI severity groups were significantly associated with central sensitization-related patient-reported symptoms. At the treatment discharge, CSI scores and psychosocial measures decreased.

According to researchers, 11% of patients in the subclinical group and 56% of patients in the extreme group reported a comorbid CSS diagnosis. – by Monica Jaramillo

Disclosure s : The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.