In the JournalsFrom OT Europe

Improved quality of life seen in patients with spine metastases treated with long-segment pedicle-screws

Patients with thoracolumbar instability due to spine metastases experienced improvements in quality of life and walking outcomes after percutaneous pedicle screw fixation, according to recently published results.

Researchers performed a retrospective review of data from a prospective database and identified 17 patients who underwent long-segment percutaneous pedicle screw fixation for thoracolumbar spinal disability due to spinal metastases. Postoperative radiation therapy was planned within 10 days of stabilization. At 3-days, 3-weeks, 6-weeks, 3-months, 6-months and 1-year postoperatively, clinical and radiological assessments were performed. Data collected included patient demographics, spinal instability neoplastic score, Kostuik score, VAS pain score and quality of life assessments with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Version 3.0 (EORTC QLQ-C30) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Investigators gave five patients an activity-monitoring device to record the distance they walked daily. Investigators compared the preoperative daily walking distance to the postoperative daily walking distance.

Investigators found no complications and saw improvements from preoperative to postoperative measures for pain level and quality of life. Preoperatively, the mean ODI score was 62.7 and at 3-days, 3-weeks, 6-weeks, 3-months, 6-months and 1-year postoperatively, the mean ODI was 35.4, 46.1, 37.6, 34, 39.1 and 30, respectively. Within the first 45 days, mean ODI improved significantly. Improvements were also seen on EORTC QLQ-C30 functional and symptomatic scales.

According to researchers, all patients underwent postoperative radiation therapy within 10 days and the five patients who were given an activity-monitoring device saw improvements in their walking distances. – by Monica Jaramillo

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.





 

Patients with thoracolumbar instability due to spine metastases experienced improvements in quality of life and walking outcomes after percutaneous pedicle screw fixation, according to recently published results.

Researchers performed a retrospective review of data from a prospective database and identified 17 patients who underwent long-segment percutaneous pedicle screw fixation for thoracolumbar spinal disability due to spinal metastases. Postoperative radiation therapy was planned within 10 days of stabilization. At 3-days, 3-weeks, 6-weeks, 3-months, 6-months and 1-year postoperatively, clinical and radiological assessments were performed. Data collected included patient demographics, spinal instability neoplastic score, Kostuik score, VAS pain score and quality of life assessments with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Version 3.0 (EORTC QLQ-C30) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Investigators gave five patients an activity-monitoring device to record the distance they walked daily. Investigators compared the preoperative daily walking distance to the postoperative daily walking distance.

Investigators found no complications and saw improvements from preoperative to postoperative measures for pain level and quality of life. Preoperatively, the mean ODI score was 62.7 and at 3-days, 3-weeks, 6-weeks, 3-months, 6-months and 1-year postoperatively, the mean ODI was 35.4, 46.1, 37.6, 34, 39.1 and 30, respectively. Within the first 45 days, mean ODI improved significantly. Improvements were also seen on EORTC QLQ-C30 functional and symptomatic scales.

According to researchers, all patients underwent postoperative radiation therapy within 10 days and the five patients who were given an activity-monitoring device saw improvements in their walking distances. – by Monica Jaramillo

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.