In the JournalsFrom OT Europe

Technique aided accuracy of injections for idiopathic adhesive capsulitis

Results published in Arthroscopy showed highly accurate and reproducible outcomes when the transcoracoacromial ligament glenohumeral injection technique was used among patients with idiopathic adhesive capsulitis.

Jianhua Wang headshot
Jianhua Wang

Jianhua Wang, MD, and colleagues used post-procedural fluoroscopic imaging to determine the accuracy of 116 unguided glenohumeral injections via the transcoracoacromial ligament technique performed in 89 patients with idiopathic adhesive capsulitis. If the first fluoroscopic picture showed intra-articular contrast, researchers rated the injection a success; however, cases in which the contrast was not intra-articular or the needle needed to be redirected more than two times were rated as failures. Researchers also identified the anterolateral corner of the acromion, the superior lateral border of coracoid tip and the curved depression of distal clavicle.

Results showed 95.7% of injections were successful. Among the five failed injections, researchers noted one shoulder had more than three redirections and four shoulders had no intra-articular contrast. According to results, 89.2% of the accurate injections had an optimal injection site on the upper third of the medial humeral head. Researchers found BMI and weight had a moderate positive correlation with depth of needle penetration.

“The transcoracoacromial ligament glenohumeral injection technique could establish a detailed standardized injection protocol for initial needle orientation and subsequent re-insertion or redirection after locating the entry site,” Wang told Healio.com/Orthopedics. – by Casey Tingle

 

Disclosures: This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

Results published in Arthroscopy showed highly accurate and reproducible outcomes when the transcoracoacromial ligament glenohumeral injection technique was used among patients with idiopathic adhesive capsulitis.

Jianhua Wang headshot
Jianhua Wang

Jianhua Wang, MD, and colleagues used post-procedural fluoroscopic imaging to determine the accuracy of 116 unguided glenohumeral injections via the transcoracoacromial ligament technique performed in 89 patients with idiopathic adhesive capsulitis. If the first fluoroscopic picture showed intra-articular contrast, researchers rated the injection a success; however, cases in which the contrast was not intra-articular or the needle needed to be redirected more than two times were rated as failures. Researchers also identified the anterolateral corner of the acromion, the superior lateral border of coracoid tip and the curved depression of distal clavicle.

Results showed 95.7% of injections were successful. Among the five failed injections, researchers noted one shoulder had more than three redirections and four shoulders had no intra-articular contrast. According to results, 89.2% of the accurate injections had an optimal injection site on the upper third of the medial humeral head. Researchers found BMI and weight had a moderate positive correlation with depth of needle penetration.

“The transcoracoacromial ligament glenohumeral injection technique could establish a detailed standardized injection protocol for initial needle orientation and subsequent re-insertion or redirection after locating the entry site,” Wang told Healio.com/Orthopedics. – by Casey Tingle

 

Disclosures: This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.