In the Journals

Hemiarthroplasty, TSA yielded pain relief for patients with atraumatic osteonecrosis

Patients with atraumatic osteonecrosis of the humeral head experienced lasting pain relief and improved range of motion after undergoing either hemiarthroplasty or total shoulder arthroplasty, according to results.

The study included 141 shoulder arthroplasties performed in patients with atraumatic osteonecrosis of the humeral head. Of these, investigators followed 67 hemiarthroplasties and 71 total shoulder arthroplasties (TSAs) for at least 2 years or until reoperation. Researchers considered imaging-confirmed osteonecrosis and failure to respond to conservative treatment modalities as an indication for surgery.

John W. Sperling

 

Results showed significant improvements in pain scores, elevation and external rotation for both hemiarthroplasty and TSA populations. Researchers also noted similar patient-reported satisfaction and excellent/satisfactory Neer ratings among both groups. Moderate to severe glenoid erosion was found in 11% of hemiarthroplasties at follow-up, with 25% of glenoid components radiographically at risk, according to results. Researchers found eight hemiarthroplasties and 11 TSAs underwent reoperation, with the most common cause being painful glenoid arthrosis in the hemiarthroplasty group and aseptic loosening in the TSA group. Hemiarthroplasty had an estimated 20-year survivorship of 87% vs. 79% for TSA, according to results. – by Casey Tingle

 

Disclosures: Schoch reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

Patients with atraumatic osteonecrosis of the humeral head experienced lasting pain relief and improved range of motion after undergoing either hemiarthroplasty or total shoulder arthroplasty, according to results.

The study included 141 shoulder arthroplasties performed in patients with atraumatic osteonecrosis of the humeral head. Of these, investigators followed 67 hemiarthroplasties and 71 total shoulder arthroplasties (TSAs) for at least 2 years or until reoperation. Researchers considered imaging-confirmed osteonecrosis and failure to respond to conservative treatment modalities as an indication for surgery.

John W. Sperling

 

Results showed significant improvements in pain scores, elevation and external rotation for both hemiarthroplasty and TSA populations. Researchers also noted similar patient-reported satisfaction and excellent/satisfactory Neer ratings among both groups. Moderate to severe glenoid erosion was found in 11% of hemiarthroplasties at follow-up, with 25% of glenoid components radiographically at risk, according to results. Researchers found eight hemiarthroplasties and 11 TSAs underwent reoperation, with the most common cause being painful glenoid arthrosis in the hemiarthroplasty group and aseptic loosening in the TSA group. Hemiarthroplasty had an estimated 20-year survivorship of 87% vs. 79% for TSA, according to results. – by Casey Tingle

 

Disclosures: Schoch reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.